An assortment of colorful cocktails on a bar counter with scattered ice cubes, each garnished with fruit, in front of a backdrop of bottles, suggesting a lively, sophisticated setting.

Top Cocktails and Recipes List—From Good to Great, from Common to Popular

Crafting this cocktail list wasn’t a task taken lightly. Popular books like “The Savoy Cocktail Book” by Harry Craddock and “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks” by David A. Embury are a good start for talking about cocktails and recipes. But to get a full list of today’s diverse drink landscape, we looked at several other important sources to pick the best cocktails.

We’ve leaned on the esteemed I.B.A. Official Cocktails, the annual rankings from Drinks International (DI), and invaluable insights from our very own certified bartenders. We should highlight Gavin Wrigley, our Head of Education and our go-to expert in the industry. Holding a dual role as the Head of the European Bartender School’s education department, Gavin brings a deep understanding of bartending, recipes, mixology, and global beverage trends. His passion and expertise have been crucial in shaping this list, ensuring it’s thorough and showcasing the world’s best cocktails.

Our list has a mix of everything – from classic to trendy cocktails, from good to great tastes, and from those that are a bit tricky to ones you can simply and easily whip up at home. Fans of popular spirits such as vodka, tequila, whiskey, and gin will find their recipe favorites here. We’ve got seasonal drinks: summer coolers, fall warmers, winter festives, and spring refreshers. Perfect for B.B.Q.s, dinners, holidays, or dates. And even a handful of non-alcoholic cocktails have danced their way onto our list, recognizing the rising popularity of fancy mocktails. 

If you want to know more about a cocktail, click on its name in the overview. You’ll see the full recipe and how to make it. Andre Sousa and his team at Overproof Media have added high-quality pictures and step-by-step videos for each drink, showcasing the art of making each cocktail. This way, you’ll learn what goes into the mix and how to make it look good.

100 Best Cocktails (Click to get to the recipes)

Mojito

A side shot of a Mojito cocktail in a highball glass on a white marmol table with half of a lime on the side

The Mojito is a refreshing Cuban cocktail that beautifully marries the flavors of mint and lime. This cocktail had roots in 16th-century Cuba when an earlier version was made with a primitive form of rum, lime, sugar, and mint. Its popularity rose globally after being favored by famous American author Ernest Hemingway during his visits to Havana. There are recipe variations to this drink, like using flavored rum or adding fruits like strawberries or raspberries. Some people use mint syrup when they don’t have fresh mint, but the fresh leaves provide a more authentic taste.

Old Fashioned

A side shot of an Old Fashioned cocktail in an old-fashioned glass on a coaster placed on a beige table with a bar spoon and an orange twist on the side.

 

The Old Fashioned is a classic American cocktail that’s simple yet sophisticated. It’s often called the “granddaddy of all cocktails,” originating in the early 1800s because it’s believed to be one of the first defined “cocktails.” The Old Fashioned is traditionally served in a short, round glass called a rocks glass or an Old Fashioned glass, named after the cocktail. Over the years, bartenders have introduced variations by using different spirits or adding new garnishes to the recipe. However, many purists believe that sticking to the basics makes this drink timeless.

Daiquiri

A side shot of a Daiquiri cocktail in a coupe glass on a black stone plate placed on a blue table with two half miles in front and a shaker, a jigger and a basket with limes on the background.

The Daiquiri is a classic cocktail from Cuba known for its tangy and sweet blend. It’s named after a small village on the eastern coast of Cuba. The cocktail gained international fame in the early 20th century, especially in the U.S., where it became a favorite during Prohibition. The Daiquiri has numerous recipes, including the Strawberry Daiquiri and the Hemingway Daiquiri, named after Ernest Hemingway – yes, he liked this cocktail too! While the original Daiquiri is served straight up, many modern versions are blended with ice, making them more like a slushie.

Negroni

A side shot of a Negroni cocktail in a old-fashioned glass on a wooden tray, with an orange and a little branch with flowers

The Negroni is an iconic Italian cocktail balanced with bitterness, sweetness, and botanical notes. It was allegedly invented in Florence, Italy when Count Camillo Negroni asked a bartender to strengthen his favorite Americano cocktail by replacing the soda water with gin. This bold cocktail is known for its deep reddish-orange hue and is often enjoyed as an aperitif before dinner to stimulate the appetite.

Margarita

A side shot of a Margarita cocktail in a coupe glass on a black stone plate placed on a blue table surrounded by lime wedges and on a pink background colour.

The Margarita from Mexico is a zesty blend of tequila, citrus, and sweetness. There are many tales regarding its origin, with one popular story suggesting it was named after a woman called Margarita in the 1930s. This cocktail is traditionally served in a salt-rimmed glass, contrasting with its tangy flavor. The Margarita has also inspired countless recipes and variations, with fruits like strawberries and mangoes offering delightful twists.

Aperol Spritz

A side shot of an Aperol Spritz cocktail in a wine glass on a wooden coaster surrounded by orange pieces placed on a beige table.

The Aperol Spritz from Italy is a bubbly, refreshing cocktail synonymous with warm summer afternoons. Its bright orange color is instantly recognizable and is especially popular as an aperitif in Northeast Italy. The drink’s light bitterness and sparkling nature make it a favorite recipe choice for social gatherings and alfresco dining.

Manhattan

A side shot of a Manhattan cocktail in a cocktail glass on a brown wooden table in front of a bar spoon, a mixing glass and a jigger.

The Manhattan is a sophisticated cocktail that exudes class and old-world charm. Believed to have been created in the late 19th century in New York City, possibly at the Manhattan Club, this cocktail is rich, warming, and slightly sweet. It’s typically garnished with a cherry and is served in a cocktail glass, often accompanied by ice clinking. Over time, bartenders have experimented with different types of whiskey and vermouth to craft their versions.

Moscow Mule

A side shot of a Moscow Mule cocktail in a highball glass on a table with two line wedge and 2 pieces of ginger in front and a brown wooden bowl on the background.

This refreshing cocktail is known for its signature copper mug and zesty ginger kick and originated in the 1940s. The Moscow Mule resulted from a collaboration between a vodka distributor and a ginger beer producer, both trying to popularize their products in the U.S. market. The drink’s unique serving method keeps it cold and enhances its effervescence and presentation. Some recipes incorporate different fruits like pineapple or even switch out the vodka for bourbon, creating a Kentucky Mule.

Espresso Martini

A side shot of a Espresso Martini cocktail in a martini glass on a dark wooden table surrounded by coffee beans.

The Espresso Martini is a fusion of coffee and alcohol, both refreshing and indulgent. It was created in the 1980s by a London bartender, supposedly for a famous model who wanted a drink that would “wake her up and then f*** her up.” This cocktail is perfect for coffee lovers and is often enjoyed as an after-dinner treat. Some bars play with the recipe by adding flavors like vanilla, hazelnut, or chocolate.

Bloody Mary

A side shot of two Bloody Mary cocktails in highball glasses on black stone coasters placed on a dark wooden table.

The Bloody Mary is a savory cocktail that combines the robust flavors of tomato, spices, and vodka. Its origins are somewhat disputed, with multiple bartenders from the 1920s and 1930s claiming its creation. Often consumed during brunch or as a hangover remedy, this cocktail is known for its customizable garnishes, ranging from celery sticks to bacon strips, making it a meal for some. Variations of the Bloody Mary, like the Bloody Caesar, use clamato juice instead of tomato juice, offering a different spin on the classic.

Cosmopolitan

A side shot of a Cosmopolitan cocktail in a martini glass on a silver coaster placed on a white marmol table with two orange slices on the side.

The Cosmopolitan gained widespread popularity in the 1990s, thanks to T.V. shows like “Sex and the City.” It’s a harmonious blend of citrus, cranberry, and vodka, served in a martini glass with a characteristic pink hue. Some bartenders have introduced variations such as the “Elderflower Cosmo,” which includes elderflower liqueur, or the “Mango Cosmopolitan,” which adds a tropical twist.

Hot Toddy

A sido shot if a Hot Toddy cocktail in a mug on a brown wooden table with a cinnamon stick on the side and orange slices behind.

The Hot Toddy is a comforting, warm drink and is a favorite during cold winter nights or when one feels under the weather. It mixes boiling water or tea, honey, lemon, and whiskey. Recipes like the “Rum Toddy” use rum instead of whiskey, while others might include spices like cinnamon or cloves for added warmth.

Paloma

A side shot of a Paloma cocktail in a highball glass on a brown coaster placed on a light blue table surrounded by a jigger, a straw and a half grapefruit.

The Paloma from Mexico is a bubbly grapefruit-based cocktail, sometimes preferred over its famous counterpart, the Margarita, in its homeland. Some recipes, like the “Spicy Paloma,” introduce a kick with jalapeños, while the “Berry Paloma” incorporates fresh fruits like strawberries or blueberries.

Long Island Iced Tea

A side shot of a Long Island Iced Tea cocktail in a highball glass on a wooden tray placed on a white table in front of a yellow wall.

Despite its name, the Long Island Iced Tea contains no actual tea. This cocktail was born in the 1970s, blends multiple spirits, and is topped off with cola. Its deceptive strength is renowned. There are recipe variations like the “Tokyo Tea,” which replaces cola with lemon-lime soda and adds Midori, or the “Peach Island Tea” which introduces peach flavor.

White Russian

A side shot of a White Russian cocktail in an Old Fashioned glass on a wooden background

A creamy and indulgent cocktail, the White Russian combines coffee liqueur, vodka, and cream. Thanks to the film “The Big Lebowski,” its popularity soared. Names like the “Blind Russian” replace the cream with Baileys Irish Cream, while the “Vegan White Russian” uses alternatives like almond or oat milk.

Tequila Sunrise

A side shot of a Tequila Sunride cocktail in a highball glass on a brown coaster placed on a beige table, with some oranges and a plant on the side.

The Tequila Sunrise is a stunning, layered cocktail that originated in the 1930s in Arizona. It beautifully blends tequila’s golden hue with grenadine’s radiant red. Its name derives from the visual effect created as the grenadine settles at the bottom, resembling a sunrise. Recipes like the “Tequila Sunset” introduce blackcurrant liqueur to give the impression of a setting sun.

Mai Tai

A side shot of a Mai Tai cocktail in a rocks glass on a wooden coaster placed on a brown placemat on a white table with a cinnamon stick and a lime wheel on a side.

The Mai Tai is a fruity and potent cocktail that combines rum with tropical flavors from the titi culture of the 1940s. While its origins are contested between two Californian bars – Trader Vic’s and Don the Beachcomber – there’s no denying its lasting impact on cocktail culture. Over the years, versions like the “Pineapple Mai Tai” or “Spiced Mai Tai” have added unique twists to this classic.

French 75

A side shot of a French 75 cocktail in a champagne flute on a wooden coaster placed on a wooden tray surrounded by a jigger, a bar spoon and a white cloth

Named after the rapid-firing 75mm field gun used by the French during World War I, the French 75 is a bubbly and sharp cocktail that originated in 1915 in Paris. A perfect blend of gin’s botanicals, lemon’s tartness, sugar’s sweetness, and the effervescence of champagne, it packs a punch much like its namesake. Some variations replace gin with cognac, offering a richer flavor profile.

Piña Colada

The Piña Colada, meaning “strained pineapple” in Spanish, is the national drink of Puerto Rico. It was created in the 1950s and is a creamy blend of pineapple, coconut, and rum, evoking the flavors of a tropical paradise. Over the years, bartenders have introduced variations like the “Blue Piña Colada,” which includes blue curaçao, giving the cocktail a vibrant blue hue.

Whiskey Sour

A perfect balance of sweet and sour, the Whiskey Sour has its roots in the 19th century. It’s a simple blend of whiskey, lemon juice, and sugar, often served with a cherry or a slice of orange. Some variations, like the “New York Sour,” add a float of red wine, giving it a layered appearance and a deeper flavor.

Sangria

A Sangria Drink in a pitcher on a white table with some oranges behind and some plant leaves on the side.

Sangria is a festive and fruity punch that has existed for centuries in Spain and Portugal. Traditionally, it’s made with red wine, but white wine versions, called “Sangria Blanca,” have also gained popularity. Fresh fruits like oranges, lemons, apples, and berries are commonly used to soak up the wine and impart their flavors. The drink is often sweetened with sugar or fruit juice and might be spiked with a splash of brandy or rum. Modern twists like the “Tropical Sangria” incorporate exotic fruits and different liquors for a unique taste.

Shirley Temple

A side shot of a Shirley Temple mocktail in a highball glass with a bar spoon on a side, placed on a blue table, in front of some cocktail tools and a light yellow wall.

The Shirley Temple is a sweet, non-alcoholic drink that has charmed generations. It’s named after the iconic child actress of the 1930s. Traditionally, it’s a blend of ginger ale, grenadine, and a maraschino cherry, served in a tall glass with ice. Its pink hue and sweet taste make it a favorite among children and those seeking an alcohol-free option. Variations of this cocktail have emerged, like the “Dirty Shirley,” which adds vodka for an adult twist, or versions that use lemon-lime soda or orange juice for different flavor profiles.

Amaretto Sour

A side shot of an Amaretto Sour cocktail in an old fashioned glass on a wooden coaster with a bar spoon on the side placed on a turquoise table and in front of a yellow wall..

The Amaretto Sour combines the sweetness of amaretto liqueur with the tanginess of lemon juice. Amaretto Liqueur is  It’s traditionally made from apricot pits or almonds, bringing the drink a deep, nutty sweetness. The cocktail achieves a balance between the sugary amaretto and the sour citrus. Over the years, recipes like the “Bourbon Amaretto Sour” have emerged, adding complexity with a splash of whiskey.

Mint Julep

A side shot of a Mint Julep cocktail in a julep cup on a black stone coaster surrounded by sugar cubes, a straw and mint leaves, placed on a white marmol table, with some cocktail tools behind in front of a white wall.

The Mint Julep is deeply rooted in the American South and is the official drink of the Kentucky Derby. It’s traditionally served in a silver or pewter cup and has a refreshing blend of bourbon, fresh mint, sugar, and water. The cocktail is known for its cooling properties, thanks to the muddled mint leaves. Over the years, recipes have emerged, such as the “Peach Mint Julep” or “Blackberry Julep,” which infuse the classic with delightful fruity flavors.

Tom Collins

A side shot of a Tom Collins cocktail in a Highball glass on a stone plate placed on a marmol table, with a shaker, a jigger, an orange and a bar spoon in the background

This cocktail is a refreshing blend of gin, lemon juice, sugar, and carbonated water, served tall over ice. As stories suggest, it gained its name from a practical joke popular in New York in 1874, where someone would be told that a fellow named Tom Collins was speaking ill of them at a nearby bar, only to arrive and be served this drink. Variations, like the “Raspberry Collins” or “Cucumber Collins,” introduce new flavors while keeping the effervescent spirit of the original.

John Collins

A side shot of a John Collins cocktail in highball glass on a coaster placed on a white cloth on a beige table surrounded by a straw, four lemons, and a shaker

The elder sibling to the Tom Collins, the John Collins, originates from London’s Limmer’s Hotel in the early 19th century. Instead of gin, this drink uses bourbon or whiskey mixed with lemon juice, sugar, and carbonated water. The switch in the spirit gives the John Collins a richer, deeper flavor than its gin-based counterpart. Over the years, creative mixologists have introduced twists like the “Pomegranate Collins” to add a fruity edge to this classic.

Lemon Drop Martini

A side shot of a Lemon Drop Martini cocktail in a martini glass with a bar spoon on the side on a square wooden coaster placed on a green table and two lemons behind.

The Lemon Drop Martini is a modern classic that became popular in the 1970s in the United States. It’s a sweet and sour mix of vodka, lemon juice, and sugar, often served in a sugar-rimmed glass to enhance its candy-like appeal. This cocktail is known for its bright and zesty flavor profile. Variations, such as the “Orange Drop Martini” or “Berry Lemon Drop,” play with different fruit essences to offer a unique spin on the original.

B-52

A side shot of a B-52 cocktail in a shot glass on a black stone coaster placed on a red cloth on a white table with a bar spoon, a jigger and coffee beans around, in front of a grey wall.

This cocktail is named after the American B-52 Stratofortress bomber and is a visually striking layered shooter that debuted in the 1970s. The drink’s layers resemble the bomber’s long-range capabilities, with each ingredient representing a different aspect. It mixes Kahlúa, Baileys Irish Cream, and Grand Marnier, is often served in a shot glass, and can be set aflame for dramatic effect (known as a “Flaming B-52.”) Over time, variations like the “B-53” with Sambuca or the “B-54” with amaretto have been crafted.

Sazerac

A side shot of a Sazerac cocktail in an old fashioned glass on a coaster surrounder by a bar spoon and lemon wedges, with plant leaves on a side.

The Sazerac is a proud emblem of New Orleans and claims to be America’s oldest known cocktail, with roots tracing back to the 1830s. Initially made with cognac, it later evolved to use rye whiskey combined with sugar, Peychaud’s bitters, and a touch of absinthe. Its rich history and unique flavor have made it an enduring classic, served in an old-fashioned glass. Over the years, variations like the “Tequila Sazerac” or “Rum Sazerac” have emerged, offering twists on the traditional base spirit.

Dry Martini

A side shot of a Gin Martini cocktail in a martini glass with lemon pieces on the side on a circle wooden tray placed on a table, and a jigger and a shaker on the background.

The Dry Martini is one of the most iconic cocktails and stands for sophistication. It was popularized in the early 20th century and is often associated with James Bond. The cocktail blends gin (or vodka) and dry vermouth and is typically garnished with an olive or a lemon twist. The ratio of gin to vermouth has been a topic of debate, leading to the creation of “Extra Dry” or “Wet” martinis. Variations like the “Dirty Martini,” with olive brine, or the “Espresso Martini“, a blend of vodka, coffee liqueur, and espresso, showcase the drink’s versatile nature.

Dirty Martini

A side shot of a Gin Martini cocktail in a martini glass on a wooden tray with a bowl with olives placed on a table and a turquoise wall on the background.

This cocktail is like the classic Martini’s edgy cousin. It was born in the early 20th century and is known for its salty taste, thanks to olive brine. While martinis are known to be crisp and clean, the Dirty Martini shakes things up with that salty kick. People who love olives usually can’t get enough of this drink. There are even spins on this classic, like the “Red Pepper Dirty Martini,” which adds a spicy twist.

Gimlet

A side shot of a Gimlet cocktail in a coupe glass on a black stone coaster placed on a black table with lime pieces, a bar spoon, three sugar cubes, and a white cloth around, in front of a red wall.

With a name that sounds like a small tool, the Gimlet sure has carved its place in cocktail history. It began as a sailor’s drink in the 19th century, used to prevent scurvy thanks to its vitamin C-rich lime juice. The Gimlet blends gin with lime juice and a touch of sweetener. Today, recipe variations like the “Vodka Gimlet” or the “Cucumber Gimlet” offer a fresh take on this citrusy classic.

Sidecar

A side shot of a Sidecar cocktail in a cocktail glass on a wooden board placed on a white marmol table with a red cloth, four sugar cubes, two lemons, a jigger, and a shaker around.

Hop on a journey with the Sidecar, a cocktail that’ll transport you straight to the roaring 1920s. With a history that’s a bit of a mystery, some say it was born in Paris, while others claim London. Either way, it blends cognac, orange liqueur, and lemon juice. It’s both tart and sweet and served in a glass with a sugared rim. If you’re feeling adventurous, try the “Pomegranate Sidecar” or switch the cognac for bourbon in a “Kentucky Sidecar.”

Bellini

A side shot of a Peach Bellini cocktail in a champagne flute on a wooden coaster with peach slices in front placed on a table in front of a blue wall.

Imagine sitting in the beautiful city of Venice, Italy. That’s where the Bellini was born in the 1940s at the famous Harry’s Bar. This cocktail is like a sunrise in a glass, combining the sweetness of peach purée with the bubbles of Prosecco. It’s a brunch favorite and brings elegance to any morning gathering. Over the years, people have tried different fruit purées, leading to recipes like the “Strawberry Bellini” or “Mango Bellini.”

Blue Hawaii

A side shot of Blue Hawaii cocktail in a hurricane glass on a wooden coaster placed on a wooden tray surrounded by white cloth two pineapple slices.

Aloha! The Blue Hawaii will instantly make you feel like you’re on a tropical vacation. This blue drink was crafted to promote a brand of liqueurs and was created in 1957 by a bartender in Waikiki. Its stunning color comes from blue curaçao, a liqueur made from the dried peel of the Laraha citrus fruit. While it’s often confused with its cousin, the Blue Hawaiian, the Blue Hawaii Drink is its tropical paradise.

Blue Hawaiian

If you ever wondered what a tropical beach tastes like, the Blue Hawaiian might be the answer. While similar in name and color to the Blue Hawaii Drink, the Blue Hawaiian has its unique twist: creamy coconut milk. This drink offers a mix of sweet, tart, and creamy flavors. Some have even added a splash of banana liqueur or grenadine for an extra fruity kick, leading to names like the “Red Hawaiian” or “Banana Blue.”

Arnold Palmer

A side shot of a Arnold Palmer mocktail in a highball glass on front, with a bar spoon and two lemon wedges behind and two lemons, a shaker and a jigger on the background.

Named after the legendary golfer, the Arnold Palmer is a refreshing blend perfect for a sunny day on the golf course or a relaxed afternoon on the porch. It combines the tang of lemonade with the brisk taste of iced tea. It’s a non-alcoholic favorite, but some people have given it a boozy twist, creating cocktails like the “John Daly,” which adds a splash of vodka.

Irish Coffee

A side shot of a Irish Coffee in a mug on a wooden table surrounded by coffee beans, a jigger and a bar spoon, in front of a white wall.

The Irish coffee is warm, comforting, and with a touch of whiskey. This drink has its roots in the 1940s from a small airport in Ireland. Intended to warm up travelers on chilly days, it combines hot coffee with Irish whiskey and sugar and is topped with a thick layer of cream. Cocktails like the “Baileys Irish Coffee” have popped up, including the popular cream liqueur.

Caipirinha

A side shot of a Caipirinha cocktail in an old fashioned glass on a black stone plate surrounded by many lime wedges on a grey table with a jigger and a shaker on the background.

This Brazilian beauty is a carnival in a glass. The Caipirinha is Brazil’s national cocktail and reflects the spirit and zest of the country. It’s made with cachaça, which is a spirit distilled from sugarcane. It’s mixed with sugar and lime for a refreshing and zesty drink. The cocktail has inspired many spin-offs, including the “Caipiroska,” which uses vodka instead of cachaça, or the “Caipifruta,” which incorporates various tropical fruits.

Bahama Mama

A side shot of a Bahama Mama cocktail in a highball glass on a wooden coaster placed on a dark brown wooden table with a green plant on the brackground

This fruity drink is like a beach vacation in a glass. It’s named after a Caribbean dance from the 1930s and combines rum and fruit juices with a touch of coffee flavor. For those who want to mix things up, there’s the “Banana Mama,” which includes banana liqueur, and the “Coconut Mama” with coconut liqueur.

Cantarito

A side shot of a Cantarito cocktail in a highball glass on a wooden board placed on a wooden table, surrounded by a tequila bottle, an orange, an orange wedge, a green cloth, half lemon, a lemon, and a cigar.

The Cantarito is a lively Mexican cocktail that is very popular at festivals. It’s made with tequila and a punch of citrus and traditionally served in a clay pot or “jarrito.” If you want a little fizz, the “Cantarito Fizz” adds soda. And for a smoky twist, the “Mezcal Cantarito” swaps tequila for mezcal.

Screwdriver Drink

A Screwdriver cocktail, shot from a side, in a highball glass on a wooden coaster placed on a white marmol table with two orange slices in front

The Screwdriver is as straightforward as cocktails come. Its quirky name is thought to come from American oil workers using screwdrivers to mix their drinks. It’s mostly vodka and orange juice, but if you’re in the mood for something different, the “Tropical Screwdriver” adds pineapple juice, and the “Cranberry Screwdriver” incorporates cranberry juice.

Rusty Nail

A side shot of a Rusty Nail cocktail in old fashioned glass on a black table surrounded by three lemons, a jigger, a plant, and a white cloth.

The Rusty Nail is a cocktail with a kick, blending the rich warmth of Scotch whisky with the sweet notes of a honey and herb liqueur. Its origins go back to the 1930s, but it became especially popular in the 1960s among the Rat Pack in Vegas. While the basic recipe is straightforward, a recipe known as the “Clavo Ahumado” or “Smoky Nail” uses mezcal for a smokier taste.

Dark and Stormy

A side shot of a Dark and Stormy cocktail in a highball glass on a table, and plant leaves on the side.

If there’s one drink that captures the spirit of Bermuda, it’s the Dark and Stormy. This cocktail pairs dark rum with spicy ginger beer, creating a refreshing taste with a little zing. The name hints at its stormy appearance, with the rum floating on top like a dark cloud. Fans of this drink might also enjoy the “Light and Stormy,” which swaps out dark rum for a lighter version.

Strawberry Daiquiri

A side shot of a Strawberry Daiquiri cocktail in a wine glass on a black stone coaster placed on a table with strawberries on a stone coaster on a side, in front of a pink wall.

A spin on the classic Daiquiri, the Strawberry Daiquiri brings together the tanginess of lime with the sweetness of strawberries. It’s often blended with ice, making it a frozen treat perfect for hot days. This cocktail became super popular in the 1970s and 1980s in beach resorts. If strawberries aren’t your thing, there are other fruity versions like the “Peach Daiquiri” or “Banana Daiquiri.”

Paper Plane

A side shot of a Paper Plane cocktail in a cocktail glass on a wooden coaster placed on a blue table with a white cloth, a jigger, and two lemons

The Paper Plane is a relatively modern cocktail, crafted in the 2000s in New York City. Its name was inspired by the song “Paper Planes” by M.I.A. This drink presents a harmonious balance between bourbon, amaro, and citrus. A fun variation to try is the “Leather Plane,” which incorporates a smoky mezcal instead of bourbon.

Gin and Tonic

A side shot of a Gin Tonic cocktail in a highball glass on a black stone coaster with lime slices on the side placed on a white marmol table with a light blue background.

This iconic drink has its roots in British colonial history. Originally, the British mixed quinine with water to prevent malaria, but it was quite bitter. They added gin, sugar, and lime, birthing the Gin and Tonic to make it more palatable. This versatile cocktail includes cocktails like the “Elderflower Gin and Tonic,” which adds elderflower liqueur, and the “Cucumber Gin and Tonic, ” garnished with fresh cucumber.

Boulevardier

A side shot of a Boulevardier cocktail in an old fashioned glass with an orange twist and plant leaves on the side on a brown wooden table, some oranges behind and a yellow wall as background.

Imagine the iconic Negroni, but swap out the gin for bourbon, and you’ve got the Boulevardier. This cocktail was popularized in Paris in the 1920s and is named after a Parisian magazine. It’s rich, complex, and perfect for those who love whiskey and bitter flavors. For a fun twist, the “Rye Boulevardier” uses rye whiskey for a spicier kick.

Cuba Libre

A side shot of a Cuba Libre cocktail in a highball glass with two half limes on the side and a basket with limes on the background.

The Cuba Libre, commonly known as a “Rum and Coke,” is more than just its two main ingredients; it’s a taste of history. Born around the Spanish-American War, its name means “Free Cuba,” echoing the era’s sentiments. Adding a lime wedge transforms a simple mix into the Cuba Libre we recognize today. A popular variation is the “Diet Libre,” which uses diet cola.

Vesper Martini

A side shot of a Vesper Martini cocktail on a stone plate and yellow background, placed on a white marmol table with a straw on the side surrounded by lemon pieces

The Vesper Martini gained fame from James Bond in Ian Fleming’s novel “Casino Royale.” Unlike the traditional Martini, the Vesper uses both gin and vodka. Bond’s famous line, “shaken, not stirred,” describes its preparation method. A variation to consider, staying in the Bond theme, is the “Quantum of Solace,” which adds a splash of orange bitters.

Martinez

A side shot of a Martinez cocktail in a coupe glass on a maroon cloth with a plate full with Maraschino cherries to the side on a wooden board placed on a white table in front of a grey stone wall.

The Martinez cocktail from the late 19th century is often considered the precursor to the modern-day Martini. This drink smoothly blends gin with sweet vermouth, giving it a richer, more aromatic flavor profile. Maraschino liqueur and orange bitters add depth and complexity. For those looking to explore further, the “White Martinez” is a lighter variation using dry vermouth instead of sweet.

Bees Knees

A side shot of a Bee's Knees cocktail in a coupe glass on a brown coaster surrounded by a lemon peel, a honey syrup jar and a bar spoon, with three lemons and a jigger on the background.

The Bees Knees is a Prohibition-era cocktail, named so because “bee’s knees” was slang for “the best” during the 1920s. It combines gin with fresh lemon juice and honey syrup, balancing tart and sweet. An intriguing twist is the “Honey Bee,” which swaps rum for gin.

Painkiller

A side shot of a Painkiller cocktail in a highball glass on a wooden coaster placed on a white marmol table, surrounded by two half oranges and a jigger

Originating from the British Virgin Islands, the Painkiller is a tropical treat. With a creamy mix of rum, pineapple juice, orange juice, and coconut cream, it’s reminiscent of sandy beaches and sunny days. If you’re in the mood for something different, the “Pusser’s Painkiller” is a variation that emphasizes using Pusser’s rum.

French Connection

A side shot of a French Connection cocktail in an Old Fashioned glass on a plate placed on a white cloth on a wooden table.

The French Connection is a classy and simple cocktail showcasing the harmony between cognac and amaretto. Its name pays homage to the iconic 1971 film of the same title. For those wanting a brighter note in their drink, the “French Connection II,” named after the film’s sequel, incorporates orange liqueur.

Bramble

A side shot of a Bramble cocktail in rocks glass on a white table surrounded by a bar spoon, a jigger, a salmon cloth, and some cherries on a plate

The Bramble is Born in the 1980s in London and is a refreshing mix of gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, and blackberry liqueur. Its deep, fruity flavors make it perfect for a sunny day. A lovely variant to consider is the “Raspberry Bramble,” which, as the name suggests, uses raspberry liqueur instead of blackberry.

Rum Runner

A Rum Runner cocktail, shot from a side, in a highball glass with three pineapple wedges on a wooden plate surrounded by a jigger, a shaker and a pineapple fruit

Originating from the Florida Keys during Prohibition, the Rum Runner is a tropical delight. This drink is made with rum, blackberry, and banana liqueur and has a flavorful punch. A popular twist to this classic is the “Frozen Rum Runner,” which blends the drink with ice for a frosty treat.

Hurricane

A side shot of a Hurricane Drink in a hurricane glass with an orange, limes, a jigger and a wipe on a brown table mat placed on a white marmol table.

This New Orleans classic was named after the hurricane lamp-shaped glasses it was originally served in. It’s tart and sweet with a robust mix of rum, passion fruit, and lemon juice. This cocktail has numerous recipes; some replace passion fruit juice with other tropical juices or add different types of rum.

Aviation Cocktail

A side shot of an Aviation cocktail in a coupe glass with a lavander branch and an orange on the side on a white marmol table, in front of a blue wall.

The Aviation is a pre-prohibition (before the 1920s) cocktail that presents the romanticism of air travel. With its pale sky-blue hue, thanks to the crème de violette, it’s a visual and flavorful journey. Some recipes might skip the crème de violette, leading to a different color and slightly altered taste.

Salty Dog

A side shot of a Salty Dog cocktail in a highball glass on a beige table surrounded by a grapefruit wedge, an orange cloth, a shaker and a jigger, in front of a white wall.

The Salty Dog is a simple yet refreshing cocktail that’s essentially a Greyhound but with a salted rim. Its name derives from its salty twist. If you prefer a sweeter version, a “Honey Salty Dog” is a variation that incorporates honey and grapefruit juice.

Sex on the Beach

A side shot of a Sex on the Beach cocktail in a highball glass on a white table with a straw, a jigger, a white cloth, and oranges around, in front of a light green background.

Sex on the Beach is a fun and fruity cocktail with origins traced back to the 1980s. It merges tropical flavors, making it a popular choice for many. Ingredients: vodka, peach schnapps, orange juice, and cranberry juice. Cocktails such as the “Peach on the Beach” have surfaced over time, focusing more on the peach flavor.

Kir Royale

A side shot of a Kir Royale cocktail in a champagne flute on a white marmol table surrounded by berries and a shaker and a jigger on the background

The Kir Royale, a classic French cocktail, is synonymous with sophistication and is often linked to celebrations. A simpler version called “Kir” replaces the champagne with white wine.

Pisco Sour

A side shot of a Pisco Sour cocktail in a old fashioned glass on a coaster placed on a white marmol table with a lemon and a straw on the side

Pisco Sour is a beloved cocktail from South America, trendy in Peru and Chile. This drink perfectly balances the sweetness and sourness. A notable variation is the “Mango Pisco Sour,” where mango pulp is added for a fruity twist.

Harvey Wallbanger

A side shot of a Harvey Wallbanger cocktail in a highball glass with two straws on a wooden coaster placed on a wooden table surrounded by orange slices.

The Harvey Wallbanger, with its catchy name, found its fame in the 1970s. Legend has it that the drink was named after a beach surfer named Harvey who, after a few too many of these drinks, would “bang” into walls. A twist on this classic is the “Freddy Fudpucker,” which swaps Galliano for tequila, offering a different kick.

Midori Sour

A side shot of a Midori Sour cocktail in an old-fashioned glass on a brown coaster placed on a green table with a bar spoon in front and some lemons on the background

Bright green in color, the Midori Sour draws attention at any bar. Its name comes from the Japanese word “Midori,” meaning green, and the key ingredient, Midori melon liqueur, originates from Japan, making this drink a delightful fusion of East and West. The “Midori Splice” combines Midori with coconut cream and pineapple juice for those wanting a creamier taste.

Grasshopper

A side shot of a Grasshopper cocktail in a martini glass with a mint sprig on a black stone plate placed on a green table with a shaker on the background.

The Grasshopper, with its cool minty flavor and green hue, often reminds folks of a dessert in a glass. The cocktail’s history traces back to New Orleans, first served in the early 20th century. A cocktail named the “Flying Grasshopper” introduces vodka, giving the drink a more potent punch.

Ingredients: crème de menthe, crème de cacao, and heavy cream.

Miami Vice

A side shot of a Miami Vice cocktail in a highball glass on a red cloth surrounded by a jigger, a straw, limes and a pineapple slice, placed on a white table and some book on the background.

The Miami Vice Drink mixes two famous drinks: the Piña Colada and the Strawberry Daiquiri. It’s like the fun and energy of Miami in a glass! It became popular in the 1980s and looks great with its bright colors, making it a top pick at beach bars. While the classic Miami Vice combines those two drinks, some versions add new flavors. For example, the Mango Vice uses mango puree.

Roy Rogers

A side shot of a Roy Rogers mocktail in a highball glass on a white marmol table with a shaker and a jigger on the background

The Roy Rogers Drink is a tasty cocktail without alcohol. It’s named after a famous cowboy actor and singer, Roy Rogers. It’s similar to the Shirley Temple drink and has been loved by those who don’t drink alcohol since the middle of the last century. The main version uses cola and cherry-flavored syrup. Some twists, like the “Roy’s Raspberry,” use raspberry syrup instead of cherry.

Chocolate Martini

A side shot of a Chocolate Martini cocktail in a martini glass on a beige cloth with chocolate squares on a side, placed on dark brown table.

The Chocolate Martini is like a chocolate treat in a glass! If you love sweet things, this drink is perfect. Many people enjoy it after dinner or when they want something that tastes like dessert. It’s made for chocolate fans. There are other versions, too, like the “White Chocolate Martini,” which uses white chocolate, or the “Mint Chocolate Martini,” which tastes like mint candy.

Bay Breeze

A side shot of a Bay Breeze cocktail in a highball glass on a brown coaster with a plant on the side placed on a white marmol table and a pineapple fruit on the brackground.

The Bay Breeze, the Downeaster or Hawaiian Sea Breeze, is a tropical drink that’ll transport you to the beach. It’s simple yet flavorful, blending cranberry and pineapple juices with vodka. The drink became a hit in the 1960s and ’70s, especially at seaside bars. While the classic version sticks to cranberry and pineapple, a cocktail called the “Sea Breeze” swaps the pineapple for grapefruit juice.

Lychee Martini

A side shot of a Lychee Martini cocktail in a martini glass on a silver coaster with a shaker, a bar spoon and lychee fruits around placed on a red table in front of a white wall.

The Lychee Martini is an elegant fusion of East meets West. Combining lychee’s exotic taste with vodka’s strong flavor creates a unique and refreshing drink. The cocktail’s origin is somewhat recent, gaining traction in the 2000s, especially in upscale bars and Asian restaurants. The “Rose Lychee Martini” adds a hint of a rose for those who want to explore other flavors.

Singapore Sling

A side shot of a Singapore Sling cocktail on a brown wood plate placed on a beige table with a shaker, a bar spoon and some pineapple slices on the background

The Singapore Sling is a legendary cocktail with a mix of fruity and herbal flavors. It was born around 1915 at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, made by a bartender named Ngiam Tong Boon. This pink drink is sweet tangy, and has several ingredients that blend beautifully. Variations have popped up worldwide; one popular one is the “Malay Sling,” which gives a spicier kick.

New York Sour

A side shot of a New York Sour cocktail in an old fashioned glass on a beige cloth with a lemon on a side placed on a table.

A twist on the classic whiskey sour, the New York Sour adds a splash of red wine, creating a beautiful layered look and a more complex flavor. The cocktail has been around since the 1880s and showcases sweet, sour, and fruity notes. While the traditional recipe sticks to the basics, some bartenders play around with the type of red wine or add a hint of other fruits, leading to variations like the “California Sour,” which uses a dry white wine.

Dirty Shirley

A side shot of a Dirty Shirley cocktail in a highball glass with a cherry in front on a black stone plate placed on a white table, with a jigger and cubes behind and a pink wall on the background.

The Dirty Shirley is a grown-up twist on the childhood favorite Shirley Temple. The drink transforms from a sweet treat to a fun cocktail by adding vodka. The name is a playful nod to the innocent image of the child actress Shirley Temple, with the “dirty” suggesting the alcoholic twist. For those who want a slightly different flavor, there’s the “Tipsy Shirley,” which adds a splash of orange juice to the mix.

Irish Trash Can

A side shot of an Irish Trash Can in a highball glass on a white marmol table with three orange slices and an orange on the side, on a dark green background.

Don’t let the quirky name fool you; the Irish Trash Can is a colorful and energetic drink that combines a mix of different spirits and ends with an upside-down can of energy drink, typically Red Bull. The name likely derives from the eclectic mix of ingredients in one “trashy” yet delightful concoction. Some people opt to switch out certain liqueurs based on preference, leading to variations like the “Tropical Trash Can,” which might include tropical fruit flavors.

Vodka Martini

Two Vodka Martini cocktails in a Martini glass on a stone plate, one garnish with orange twist and other one with olives

The Vodka Martini is a cool and timeless drink. It’s like the regular Martini but uses vodka instead of gin. People started loving it even more in the last century, especially when famous characters like James Bond said they liked it. You can make it in many ways, but one popular twist is the “Dirty Vodka Martini,” which has olive juice for a salty taste.

Hot Buttered Rum

A side shot of a Hot Buttered Rum cocktail in a mug with two lemons behind on a wooden tray placed on a brown wooden table and a plant on the background.

Hot Buttered Rum is a warm drink that’s great for chilly nights. It’s been loved since the colonial days in America. This drink has a creamy butter mix, rum, and hot water or cider. It feels like a cozy hug in a mug. Some people like to add different spices or sweeteners, like in the “Spiced Buttered Rum” version.

Alabama Slammer

A side shot of a Alabama Slammer cocktail in a highball glass on a coaster surrounded by straws and lemon slices with lemons and a orange behind placed on a beige table, in front of a light pink wall.

The Alabama Slammer is a bright, fruity drink from the Southern United States. It became really popular in the 1970s and 1980s. The name reminds people of the South and its strong taste. You can drink it as a shot or with ice in a big glass. It mixes the taste of orange with whiskey. Some people also add a bit of lemon-lime soda to make it bubbly.

Last Word Cocktail

A Last Word cocktail, shot from above, in a cocktail glass on a smal plate placed on a brown placemat with a jigger, two limes, a white cloth around.

The Last Word Cocktail mixes gin, chartreuse, maraschino liqueur, and lime juice. It started just before Prohibition in a place called the Detroit Athletic Club. People forgot about it for some time, but it came back around the 2000s, mainly in Seattle. The name suggests it’s a drink you won’t forget. The “Final Ward” version uses rye whiskey instead of gin and lemon instead of lime.

Vieux Carré

A Vieux Carre cocktail on a platform surrounded by two lemons and a jigger

The Vieux Carré comes from New Orleans and shows the city’s love for drinks. Made first at the famous Hotel Monteleone’s Carousel Bar in the 1930s, it’s named after the old part of the city. It has a mix of rye whiskey, cognac, and vermouth, with herbal touches.

Gin Rickey

A side shot of a Gin Rickey cocktail in highball glass on a black stone coaster surrounded by straws and lime pieces, placed on a white marmol table with a jigger and a shaker behind, in front a white wall as background.

The Gin Rickey is a simple and refreshing drink made with gin, lime, and soda water. It was created in Washington, D.C., during the late 1800s. It was originally made with bourbon but switched to gin over time. The drink is like a gin and tonic but uses lime instead of tonic. Because it’s so basic, many people like to add fruits or other flavors to make their version.

Gin Fizz

A side shot of a Gin Fizz cocktail in a highball glass on a beige table with a bowl full of lemons behind and lemon slices on the side.

The Gin Fizz is a bubbly and frothy drink that’s been enjoyed for over a century. It mixes gin with citrus, sugar, and soda, but its special part is the egg white that makes it frothy. The drink started in New Orleans, a city known for its cocktail culture. There’s a version called the “Ramos Gin Fizz” which adds cream and orange flower water, making it rich and creamy.

Skinny Margarita

A side shot of a Skinny Margarita cocktail in a margarita glass on a wooden coaster placed on a green cloth surrounded by limes

The Skinny Margarita offers a fresh, light version of the classic Margarita. It combines tequila, fresh lime juice, and a bit of agave syrup for a drink that’s low in calories but full of taste. This cocktail leaves out the usual triple sec, which cuts down on sugar. Health-conscious trends inspired its creation, making it a hit with those who like a tasty drink but want to keep it healthy.

Greyhound

A side shot of a Greyhound cocktail in a highball glass on a black stone plate with a straw on the side placed on a white marmol table, and two half grapefruits on the background.

The Greyhound is a straightforward and tangy cocktail. It’s just a mix of grapefruit juice and vodka or gin. The drink got its name, some say because it was popular in the 1930s at the Greyhound bus terminals. Adding a salt rim to the glass makes the drink a “Salty Dog.”

Mudslide

A side shot of a Mudslide cocktail in a hurricane glass on a white marmol table surrounded by Oreo cookies and chocolate blocks

The Mudslide is a rich and creamy dessert-like cocktail. It blends vodka, coffee liqueur, and Irish cream, making it taste almost like a chocolate milkshake. It started in the Cayman Islands during the 1970s. You might find it served either blended with ice, making it frozen, or just shaken and poured over ice.

Kamikaze

A side shot of a Kamikaze cocktail in a martini glass on a wooden coaster placed on a green table with a lime wedge and a lime slice in front and a yellow wall on the background.

The Kamikaze is a lively and citrusy drink. It combines vodka, triple sec, and lime juice. It got its name from the Japanese word “kamikaze,” which means “divine wind,” possibly because it’s so smooth it sneaks up on you. This cocktail can be served as a shot or in a cocktail glass. It has many fruity recipe variations, like using blue curaçao for a “Blue Kamikaze.”

Cape Codder

A side shot of a Cape Codder cocktail in a highball glass on a wooden board placed on a white cloth with lime pieces around.

The Cape Codder is a refreshing and simple drink. It’s made of just cranberry juice and vodka. It’s named after the Cape Cod region in Massachusetts, known for its cranberry bogs. Sometimes, a splash of lime or lemon juice is added for a twist. If you add grapefruit juice, it’s often called a “Sea Breeze.”

Strawberry Margarita

A side shot of a Strawberry Margarita in a hurricane glass on a silver metal tray on a black table surrounded by a strainer, a red cloth and a strawberry.

The Strawberry Margarita is a fruity twist on the classic Margarita. It blends tequila with fresh strawberries, lime juice, and triple sec. It’s especially popular in the summertime because of its sweet and refreshing taste. Some bartenders like to add a hint of basil or balsamic vinegar for a unique kick. The frozen version, blended with ice, is a favorite for many.

Vodka Gimlet

A side shot of a Vodka Gimlet in a coupe glass on a white marmol table with two lime wedges in front

The Vodka Gimlet is a cool and zesty drink. While the traditional Gimlet uses gin, this version uses vodka mixed with lime juice and a bit of sugar. It’s said to have been a favorite among sailors to prevent scurvy, thanks to the vitamin C in limes. Some people enjoy a modern twist by adding fresh cucumber or mint.

Jack and Coke

A side shot of a Jack and Coke cocktail in a highball glass on a black stone plate placed on a light grey table surrounded by a straw, two lime wedges and a lime

The Jack and Coke is a straightforward and beloved drink. It’s a mix of Jack Daniel’s whiskey and Coca-Cola, which results in a sweet and slightly smoky flavor. This drink became popular in the U.S. during the 20th century and remains a favorite in many bars. Sometimes, a slice of lime is added for a citrusy touch. A similar drink using rum instead of whiskey is known as “Rum and Coke.”

Penicillin Cocktail

A side shot of a Penicillin cocktail in a rocks glass on a wooden tray surrounded by three lemons, a jigger, a shaker, and a bowl with ginger and lemon.

The Penicillin Cocktail is a modern classic known for its smoky and citrus flavors blend. It combines Scotch whiskey, lemon juice, honey-ginger syrup, and a splash of smoky Scotch on top. Created in the early 2000s by a New York bartender, its name suggests it’s a cure-all, much like the antibiotic. Some bartenders add a slice of fresh ginger if you want a spicy kick.

Gibson Cocktail

A side shot of a Gibson cocktail in a coupe glass on a black stone coaster on a grey surface surrounded by a white cloth, a transparent plate with two pickled onions, and a bar spoon with a pickled onion, in front of a black background.

The Gibson Cocktail is much like the classic Martini but has a small twist. Instead of olives or a lemon twist, it’s garnished with a pickled onion. This drink dates back to the early 20th century, and its origin is a bit debated. Some say it was named after an American diplomat who loved garnering his Martini with an onion. Others believe a San Francisco businessman, Walter D. K. Gibson, created it.

Sloe Gin Fizz

A side shot of a Sloe Gin Fizz cocktail on a black stone plate place on a white marmol table with a jigger, a shaker and some oranges in the background

The Sloe Gin Fizz is a bubbly and slightly tangy cocktail, perfect for those who love a refreshing drink with a hint of sweetness. It mixes sloe gin, a red liqueur made from the sloe berry, with lemon juice, sugar, and soda water. This drink gained popularity in the U.S. during the first half of the 20th century. Some variations might add an egg white to give the cocktail a silky texture.

Kentucky Mule

A side shot of a Kentucky Mule cocktail in a highball cocktail with a ginger pieces and a bar spoon on a wooden tray placed on a white marmol table and a shaker, a lime and a plant on the background.

The Kentucky Mule is a delightful twist on the Moscow Mule. Instead of vodka, it uses bourbon. This results in a richer and slightly sweeter flavor profile. The drink is usually served in a copper mug, keeping it cold. Like its vodka counterpart, the Kentucky Mule offers a pleasant combination of spice from the ginger beer and tartness from the lime.

Campari Spritz

A side shot of a Campari Spritz cocktail in a wine glass on a beige table with orange slices in front and a half orange behind.

The Campari Spritz is a vibrant and bitter-sweet cocktail that has its roots in Italy. It’s a popular aperitif, especially in the northern regions, and is perfect for those who appreciate a refreshing drink with a bitter edge. This drink combines Campari, a well-known Italian bitter liqueur, with Prosecco and a splash of soda. It’s usually garnished with an orange slice or twist. Many other variations emerge as the spritz culture grows, but the Campari Spritz remains a classic.

Limoncello Spritz

A side shot of a Limoncello Spritz cocktail in a tumbler glass on a black stone plate placed on a white marmol table surrounded by mint and a lemon wedge.

Limoncello Spritz is like a sip of the Italian summer. Using limoncello, a sweet and zesty lemon liqueur from southern Italy, this cocktail is both refreshing and aromatic. It blends limoncello with Prosecco and soda, resulting in a bubbly and citrusy delight. It’s often served with a lemon twist or slice, and it’s perfect for a sunny afternoon.

Black Manhattan

A side shot of a Black Manhattan in a coupe glass on a dark grey table with a bar spoon, a jigger, a mixing glass, and a green cloth around, in front of a salmon wall.

The Black Manhattan is a darker and richer twist on the classic Manhattan cocktail. Instead of sweet vermouth, this version incorporates Averna, an Italian amaro with a complex flavor profile including citrus, licorice, and herbs. This substitution gives the drink a deeper taste, making it perfect for those who enjoy a more robust cocktail. Some might garnish it with a cherry or an orange twist to add a touch of brightness.

Tom and Jerry

A side shot of a Tom and Jerry cocktail in a mug on a white table surrounded by cinnamon, nutmeg and sugar, with some plant leaves on a side, in front of a blue wall.

The Tom and Jerry drink is a classic warm cocktail that becomes especially popular during the winter holidays. It’s like a boozy, spiced version of hot milk or eggnog. The drink has an interesting history that dates back to the 19th century. While it shares a name with the famous cartoon cat and mouse, its origins are unrelated. This creamy cocktail combines a spiced batter with dark rum and brandy; then it’s topped with hot milk or water. When served, it’s often garnished with a sprinkle of nutmeg, making it perfect for cold nights.

Blue Lagoon Drink

A side shot of a Blue Lagoon cocktail in a highball glass on a bart table and blur background.

The Blue Lagoon is a vibrant cocktail that’s as eye-catching as delicious. Its bright blue color comes from the blue curaçao, a citrus-based liqueur. The cocktail combines this blue curaçao with vodka and lemonade, resulting in a sweet and tangy taste. The Blue Lagoon is often served in a tall glass with a slice of lemon or a cherry, making it a favorite for summer parties or poolside lounging.

Lynchburg Lemonade

A side shot of a Lynchburg Lemonade cocktail in a highball glass surrounded by lemon wedges on a blue table, with some cocktail tools behind and in front of a yellow wall.

The Lynchburg Lemonade is named after the hometown of Jack Daniel’s distillery and is a refreshing cocktail with a whiskey kick. It’s a mix of Tennessee whiskey, like Jack Daniel’s, with lemon-lime soda, triple sec, and a splash of lemon juice. This cocktail offers a perfect balance of sweet and sour flavors, making it a great choice for warm days. It’s typically served over ice in a tall glass and garnished with a lemon slice.

Honorable Mentions

While we picked 100 great cocktails for our list, several notable drinks narrowly missed our main list. Still, they are undeniably deserving of honorable mentions. We’ve grouped them by their main spirit:

Check also our pages about Cognac Cocktails, Scotch Cocktails, Bourbon Cocktails, Champagne Cocktails, Mezcal Cocktails, Brandy Cocktails, Beer Cocktails, Wine Cocktails and Coffee cocktails.

In a rush and looking for something simple? Check out our easy cocktail recipes and simple mixed drinks.

More Seasonal Cocktails

Seasons change, and so do our cocktail preferences. We listed some more season-related cocktails that aren’t covered above.

Summer Cocktails

The perfect summer cocktail often involves fresh fruits, herbs, and other seasonal ingredients, paired with lighter spirits and mixers to create refreshing and quenching drinks: Frozen Daiquiri, Gin Daisy, Mimosa, Southside Cocktails, Coconut Mojito, Ranch Water, Gin Basil Smash.

Winter cocktails

Winter cocktails often have warming and rich ingredients like spices, creams, and robust spirits. They’re perfect for sipping by a fireplace or serving at holiday gatherings: Whiskey Ginger, Brandy Crusta, Alexander, Mulled Wine, Irish Mule, Classic Eggnog, and Sugar Cookie Martini.

Fall cocktails

Fall cocktails are characterized by the use of seasonal produce like apples, pears, and pumpkins, as well as warm spices and flavors reminiscent of autumn festivities: Lavender Martini, Nutty Irishman, Big Apple Manhattan, Appletini, Dalgona Martini, Fall Margarita.

Spring cocktails

Spring cocktails are refreshing and light, often using fresh herbs, floral notes, and bright fruit flavors: Tipperary, St. Germain Spritz, Orange Crush, Rainbow Sangria, Tiojito, Elderflower Spritz, Elderflower Martini, Blueberry Lavender Fizz.

More Cocktails for Specific Occasions

  • ChristmasChristmas martini, Jack Frost Cocktail, Jingle Juice, Christmas Margarita, Peppermint Martini.
  • Halloween – Halloween Margarita, Vampire’s Kiss, Halloween Punch, Corpse Reviver, Zombie, Death in the Afternoon, Bloody Mary.
  • 4th of July – Firecracker, Red, White & Booze Popsicles, Stars & Stripes, Americano, Cape Codder, Firecracker Gelatine Shots.
  • Thanksgiving – Pumpkin Martini, Pear Martini, Pumpkin old-fashioned, Cranberry Martini.
  • Easter – Chocolate Negroni, Chocolate Orange Espresso Martini, Smartini, Bunny Mary, Lemosas.
  • More holidays and festivities: Mardi Gras, Valentine’s Day, New Year’s Eve, St Patrick’s Day and other Signature Cocktails.

Brand Based Cocktails

A lot of people like to search based on Brands: RumChata Drinks, blue curacao cocktails, St Germain Cocktails, Malibu Cocktails, Kahlua Cocktails, Jack Daniels Cocktails, and Empress gin cocktails.

Fruity cocktails

Check out our cocktail collection pages if you are looking for specific fruit cocktails. 

Canned Ready-to-drink Cocktails

Pre-mixed or canned cocktails have surged in popularity recently, and it’s easy to see why. They offer a quick, convenient way to enjoy a cocktail without the fuss of mixing.

  • Cutwater Spirits – Known for their variety, they offer everything from a spicy Bloody Mary to a refreshing Tequila Paloma. The taste? It’s surprisingly close to a freshly made cocktail.
  • High Noon Sun Sips – If you’re a fan of vodka sodas, this is for you. Made with real vodka and fruit juice, their grapefruit and pineapple flavors stand out.
  • On The Rocks Cocktails – This brand serves up old favorites like the Old Fashioned and the Margarita for those who prefer classics. They use premium spirits, so you get quality in every sip.
  • Tip Top Proper Cocktails – Negroni fans rejoice! Tip Top serves one of the best canned Negronis on the market, along with other classics like the Manhattan.
  • F!VE Drinks Co – These cans pack a punch. Think Mojitos, Margaritas, and more, all with a solid alcohol content and authentic taste.

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