Mimosa Cocktail Drink

Mimosa

A shot of Gavin Wrigley looking to the camera in a dimly lit room
Written by Gavin Wrigley
Andrea
Tested by
Andrea Ottaiano

This mimosa recipe is your go-to if you want to make a classic cocktail with minimal ingredients! It’s a drink that’s as easy to make as it is enjoyable to sip.

Best Mimosa Recipe

Elevate your brunch game with this straightforward mimosa cocktail recipe! This simple yet luxurious brunch cocktail is a brunch-time must-have made with sparkling wine and orange juice.

Prep time:

1 minute

Mixing time:

1 minute

Servings:

1

Calories:

53 kl

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Champagne
  • 2 oz orange juice, freshly squeezed
  • Orange slice or twist, for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Champagne Flute
  • Measuring Jigger

Instructions

  • Add Orange Juice: Pour 2 oz orange juice into the flute.
  • Add Champagne: Carefully pour 2 oz Champagne over the orange juice.
  • Garnish: Garnish with an orange slice or twist if desired.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Orange Juice: Grapefruit or pomegranate juice also works to switch up the flavors. I've tried it, and it's delicious.
  • Champagne: No Champagne? No worries. Prosecco or Cava make great alternatives. Seltzer can work in a pinch if you're out of sparkling wine entirely.

Making a Pitcher of Mimosa:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, you'll need 16 oz of orange juice and 16 oz of Champagne.
  • Mix: Combine the orange juice and Champagne in a large pitcher and stir gently.
  • Serve: Pour into individual Champagne flutes and garnish as usual.

Making it Non-Alcoholic (Virgin Mimosa):

  • Orange Juice: Stick with your favorite type of orange juice.
  • Champagne Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic sparkling wine or water for the fizz.
  • Proceed As Usual: Follow the original recipe steps using these non-alcoholic options.

Making it Vegan:

  • Orange Juice: Make sure your brand doesn't contain animal-derived additives (though most don't).
  • Champagne: Not all wines are vegan due to the fining process, which can use animal-derived products. Choose a vegan-certified Champagne.

Nutrition Facts

Calories
53
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
0.1
g
0
%
Saturated Fat
 
0.01
g
0
%
Sodium
 
5
mg
0
%
Carbohydrates
 
7
g
2
%
Fiber
 
0.1
g
0
%
Sugar
 
5
g
6
%
Potassium
 
163
mg
5
%
Protein
 
0.4
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
0.02
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
0.02
g
Vitamin A
 
113
IU
2
%
Vitamin C
 
28
mg
34
%
Calcium
 
11
mg
1
%
Iron
 
0.3
mg
2
%

 

Mimosa Cocktail Drink

Best Mimosa Recipe

Gavin Wrigley Written by Gavin Wrigley
Jump to Video
Elevate your brunch game with this straightforward mimosa cocktail recipe! This simple yet luxurious brunch cocktail is a brunch-time must-have made with sparkling wine and orange juice.
Prep time: 1 minute
Mixing time: 1 minute
Servings: 1
Calories: 53

Ingredients
 

  • 2 oz Champagne
  • 2 oz orange juice - freshly squeezed
  • Orange slice or twist - for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Champagne Flute
  • Measuring Jigger

Instructions

  • Add Orange Juice: Pour 2 oz orange juice into the flute.
  • Add Champagne: Carefully pour 2 oz Champagne over the orange juice.
  • Garnish: Garnish with an orange slice or twist if desired.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Orange Juice: Grapefruit or pomegranate juice also works to switch up the flavors. I've tried it, and it's delicious.
  • Champagne: No Champagne? No worries. Prosecco or Cava make great alternatives. Seltzer can work in a pinch if you're out of sparkling wine entirely.

Making a Pitcher of Mimosa:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, you'll need 16 oz of orange juice and 16 oz of Champagne.
  • Mix: Combine the orange juice and Champagne in a large pitcher and stir gently.
  • Serve: Pour into individual Champagne flutes and garnish as usual.

Making it Non-Alcoholic (Virgin Mimosa):

  • Orange Juice: Stick with your favorite type of orange juice.
  • Champagne Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic sparkling wine or water for the fizz.
  • Proceed As Usual: Follow the original recipe steps using these non-alcoholic options.

Making it Vegan:

  • Orange Juice: Make sure your brand doesn't contain animal-derived additives (though most don't).
  • Champagne: Not all wines are vegan due to the fining process, which can use animal-derived products. Choose a vegan-certified Champagne.

What is a Mimosa?

Mimosa is a cocktail made with equal parts of Champagne and chilled citrus juice, usually orange. It’s served in a tall Champagne flute and is popularly associated with brunch or daytime events. The drink’s origin is unclear, but it’s widely embraced for its refreshing yet boozy kick. This beloved cocktail is listed among the “Contemporary Classics” by the IBA(International Bartender Association).

A side shot of a Mimosa cocktail in a champagne flute on a table with two orange slices in front and two oranges on the background

What is a Mimosa made of – The ingredients

Get ready to make your own Mimosa with the following ingredients:

  • Champagne: Provides the effervescence and alcoholic kick to the cocktail.
  • Orange Juice: Adds natural sweetness and citrusy brightness, balancing the Champagne.
  • Ice Cubes (Optional): Cools the drink without diluting the core flavors when preferred.
  • Orange Slice or Twist (Optional): Serves as a garnish, adding a touch of visual appeal and a hint of extra citrus aroma.

Prosecco and oranges laid out on a white bar table

How do you make a Mimosa cocktail?

Follow our guide to make your own delicious Mimosa:

1
<p>Pour 2 ounces of freshly squeezed and chilled orange juice into the Champagne flute.</p>

Pour 2 ounces of freshly squeezed and chilled orange juice into the Champagne flute.

2
<p>Carefully add 2 ounces of chilled Champagne to the flute’s orange juice.</p>

Carefully add 2 ounces of chilled Champagne to the flute’s orange juice.

3
<p>If desired, garnish the top of the drink with an orange slice or twist for added visual appeal and a hint of extra citrus aroma.</p>

If desired, garnish the top of the drink with an orange slice or twist for added visual appeal and a hint of extra citrus aroma.

What’s the best alcohol (Champagne) for a Mimosa?

Champagne is the traditional choice, and it adds that classic, sophisticated fizz. If you’re going for high-end, consider Moët & Chandon or Veuve Clicquot; these brands offer nuanced flavors to elevate your cocktail. On a budget? No worries. Prosecco is an excellent Italian alternative that’s often less expensive. La Marca and Mionetto are reliable brands that offer good quality without breaking the bank. If you prefer a sweeter touch, Spanish Cava, like Freixenet, might be your best bet. But here’s the bottom line: for a mimosa that ticks all the boxes, go for a brut Champagne or Prosecco. They offer the right balance of dryness and flavor to complement the sweet orange juice.

What is the difference between a Mimosa and a Bucks fizz?

The mimosa and the Buck’s Fizz are cocktails that feature a vibrant combination of citrus and sparkling wine, but there are some key differences between the two. First, the Buck’s Fizz originated in England, specifically at the Buck’s Club in London, in the 1920s. On the other hand, the mimosa generally claims American roots and gained fame around the same time.

Regarding ingredients, both drinks use orange juice and sparkling wine, but the ratios differ. A Buck’s Fizz traditionally leans more on the sparkling wine, often using a 2:1 ratio of sparkling wine to orange juice. The mimosa uses an equal-parts approach, keeping a 1:1 ratio between the wine and the juice.

Another point to consider is the type of sparkling wine used. While Champagne is a popular choice for both, the Buck’s Fizz originally featured it as a must-have, aligning with its British high-society origins. The mimosa is a bit more forgiving, often appearing in versions that use Prosecco, Cava, or other sparkling wines.

A side shot of a Mimosa cocktail in a champagne flute on a table with two orange slices in front, two oranges on the background and a plant on the side

What food do you serve with Mimosas?

Mimosa cocktails pair exceptionally well with a variety of foods that you’d typically find on a late-morning spread. 

Think of light, fluffy pancakes topped with fresh berries or a hearty avocado toast sprinkled with just the right chili flakes. The mimosa’s citrusy kick cuts through the richness of eggs Benedict or a cheese omelet, balancing the meal and prepping your palate for the next bite. 

Don’t forget the seafood options; smoked salmon on a bagel or a shrimp cocktail can be fantastic counterparts to this bubbly beverage. 

Whether you’re leaning into the sweet or savory side of brunch, a mimosa serves as a versatile companion.

What juices can I use for a Mimosa?

Sure, the classic mimosa uses orange juice, but don’t let tradition box you in. Grapefruit juice offers a tart twist and adds a beautiful blush hue to your glass. If you’re looking for something more exotic, try pomegranate juice; it brings a rich color and a burst of antioxidants. Pineapple juice can transport you to a tropical paradise with just one sip, adding a sweet and tangy vibe to your brunch. Peach nectar makes for a sweeter, almost dessert-like experience, perfect for those who prefer less tang. Remember, no matter what juice you pick, the key is to use it freshly squeezed when possible.

Is there a relation with the Mimosa flower?

No, there is no direct relation. While they share the same name and offer vibrant colors, their similarities end there. The mimosa flower is often linked to International Women’s Day and symbolizes strength and femininity.

A side shot of a Mimosa cocktail in a champagne flute on a table with two orange slices in front and two oranges on the background

Mimosa variations

Want to do something similar yet different? Give a variation from our big selection of recommendations a try:

  • Grand Mimosa: Elevating your experience, a splash of Grand Marnier joins Champagne, offering a sophisticated orange flavor. The cognac and bitter orange blend of Grand Marnier imparts a subtly woody taste. I admire its elegant citrus notes, perfect for celebratory moments.
  • Tropical Mimosa: Merges sparkling wine with a mix of tropical juices like mango, pineapple, or passion fruit. The fruity mix adds sweetness and an exotic touch, reminiscent of a beach getaway. Its vibrant character is a mood booster for me.
  • Berry Mimosa: Berry juices like raspberry, strawberry, or blackberry blend with the bubbly, creating a rich, fruity sweetness. This contrasts beautifully with the dryness of the Champagne.
  • Sunrise Mimosa: Combining orange juice, a splash of grenadine, and sparkling wine, it presents a stunning gradient of colors. The sunrise effect is achieved by the settling grenadine, which also adds a sweet pomegranate flavor.
  • Pomegranate Mimosa: Pomegranate juice and sparkling wine come together for a tart and slightly sweet mix. The deep red hue and antioxidants from the pomegranate make it visually striking and healthful.
  • Apple Cider Mimosa: A cozy blend of apple cider and sparkling wine captures the essence of fall. The warm, spiced flavor of apple cider creates a comforting vibe, which I find perfect for chilly mornings.
  • Pear Mimosa: Pear nectar and Champagne create a light, sweet, and fragrant mixture. The fresh taste of pear pairs well with the crisp bubbles.
  • Cranberry Mimosa: A festive mix of cranberry juice and sparkling wine, ideal for celebrations. The bold, tart flavor and vibrant red color make it both tasty and visually appealing.
  • Coconut Mimosa: Sparkling wine meets coconut water for a refreshing, slightly tropical twist. The subtle sweetness and nuttiness of coconut water create a light and enjoyable experience.
  • Blushing Mimosa: Combines orange juice and grenadine with sparkling wine for a visually appealing drink. The sweet depth from grenadine enhances the citrus base.
  • Hibiscus Mimosa: Sparkling wine infused with hibiscus syrup or tea adds a floral, tangy touch. The deep pink color and exotic flavor make it a unique choice.
  • Bellini Mimosa: A fusion of peach purée and sparkling wine, inspired by the classic Bellini. The velvety texture and fragrant aroma of peach enrich the drink.
  • Pineapple Coconut Mimosa: Combining pineapple juice and coconut cream with sparkling wine for a tropical experience. The tangy sweetness of pineapple and creamy coconut flavor are a delightful mix.
  • Mango Mimosa: Mango nectar blends with sparkling wine for a lush, tropical sweetness. The rich, fruity flavor of mango is both refreshing and indulgent.
  • Watermelon Mimosa: Fresh watermelon juice and sparkling wine create a perfect summer choice. The light, sweet watermelon flavor is ideal for hot days.
  • Lavender Mimosa: An aromatic blend of lavender syrup with sparkling wine. The floral, slightly sweet lavender syrup offers a unique, calming quality.
  • Kiwi Mimosa: Fresh kiwi purée and sparkling wine combine for a tangy, slightly sweet taste. The vibrant green color and zesty flavor of kiwi make it refreshing.
  • Cherry Mimosa: Cherry juice or purée with sparkling wine for a fruity beverage. The sweet-tart flavor of cherries is both delicious and visually appealing.

A Mimosa cocktail, shot from above, in a champagne flute on a table with two orange slices in front

History and origin

The mimosa cocktail has an interesting but somewhat murky history. While it shares similarities with the Buck’s Fizz, a British drink that predates it, the mimosa is generally credited as a creation from the United States. Most stories place its origin in the late 1920s or early 1930s. It gained its name from the mimosa flower, which has a bright, orange-yellow hue similar to the cocktail.

Frank Meier, a bartender at the Ritz Hotel in Paris, published the mimosa recipe in his 1936 book, “The Artistry of Mixing Drinks.” While Meier did not claim to have invented the mimosa, his book helped popularize it in Europe and the United States.

The mimosa’s simple orange juice and Champagne ingredient list made it an accessible and easily adaptable drink, contributing to its widespread appeal. Over the years, it became synonymous with brunch and daytime events, often served at weddings, baby showers, and other festive gatherings.

 

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FAQ

How many calories are in a mimosa?
A typical mimosa contains around 80-100 calories, depending on the brand of Champagne and the sweetness of the orange juice.
How strong is a mimosa in terms of ABV and proof?
A mimosa generally has an ABV of 6-12%, resulting in a proof range of approximately 12-24.
What type of alcohol is used in a mimosa?
Champagne is the alcohol of choice in a mimosa, giving the drink its characteristic effervescence.
In what type of glass is a mimosa typically served?
Traditionally, a mimosa is served in a Champagne flute to showcase its bubbles and maintain its effervescence.
What does a mimosa taste like?
Mimosa has a refreshing, lightly alcoholic taste with citrus notes from the orange juice balancing the crispness of the Champagne.
What is the typical ratio of ingredients in a mimosa?
The standard ratio for a mimosa is 1:1, meaning equal parts Champagne and orange juice.
Is a mimosa a brunch-only drink?
While commonly associated with brunch, mimosas can be enjoyed at any time of day and are often served at various celebratory events.
Is a mimosa high in sugar?
The sugar content varies based on the Champagne and orange juice type but can range from moderate to high.
Can I use Prosecco instead of Champagne?
Yes, Prosecco can be an alternative to Champagne, offering a slightly sweeter and less yeasty flavor.
What is a mimosa with vodka called?
A mimosa with vodka instead of sparkling wine is commonly called a "Screwmosa".

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