Negroni Cocktail Drink

Negroni

A shot of Gavin Wrigley looking to the camera in a dimly lit room
Written by Gavin Wrigley
Andrea
Tested by
Andrea Ottaiano

This Negroni recipe has all the ingredients to make your evening special! This cocktail is not just a drink; it’s an experience that’s incredibly easy to make.

Negroni Cocktail Recipe

Elevate your evening with this classic Negroni recipe! Blending gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth, this timeless cocktail offers the perfect balance of bitter and sweet, making it an ideal sipper for any occasion.

Prep time:

1 minute

Mixing time:

1 minute

Servings:

1

Calories:

164 kl

Ingredients

  • 1 oz Gin
  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1 oz sweet Vermouth
  • Ice cubes
  • Orange slice or twist, for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Old Fashioned Glass
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon

Instructions

  • Prep Glass: Fill your Old Fashioned glass with ice cubes.
  • Add Gin: Pour 1 oz Gin into the mixing glass.
  • Add Campari: Measure and pour 1 oz Campari into the glass.
  • Add Vermouth: Add 1 oz sweet Vermouth to the mix.
  • Stir Gently: Use a bar spoon to stir the ingredients gently.
  • Strain: Re-fill the Old Fashioned glass with fresh ice and strain the mixture into the glass.
  • Garnish: Place an orange slice or twist into the glass for garnish.
  • Serve: Enjoy your Negroni immediately. Cheers!

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Gin: If you find yourself without gin, you can try vodka for a less botanical flavor. I've also used Aperol instead of Campari for a softer, less bitter profile.
  • Campari: Aperol is a good alternative if you prefer something other than Campari's bitter edge. It's lighter but still brings that orange essence.
  • Sweet Vermouth: I've used dry vermouth in a pinch. It changes the character of the drink but still works. Just add a small splash of simple syrup to balance the bitterness.

Making a Pitcher of Negroni:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 8 oz of gin, 8 oz of Campari, and 8 oz of sweet vermouth.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth. Stir well.
  • Serve: Pour the mixture into individual ice-filled Old Fashioned glasses, garnish with an orange slice or twist, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Gin Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic gin substitute; these are available and do a reasonable job mimicking gin's botanicals. You can also replace gin for soda water.
  • Campari Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic aperitif or make a simple syrup infused with orange peel and a touch of bitterness from a dash of grapefruit juice.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes instead of the regular ingredients, follow the original steps, and enjoy a non-alcoholic Negroni.

Nutrition Facts

Calories
164
% Daily Value*
Sodium
 
0.3
mg
0
%
Carbohydrates
 
9
g
3
%
Potassium
 
1
mg
0
%
Protein
 
0.02
g
0
%
Iron
 
0.01
mg
0
%

 

Negroni Cocktail Drink

Negroni Cocktail Recipe

Gavin Wrigley Written by Gavin Wrigley
Jump to Video
Elevate your evening with this classic Negroni recipe! Blending gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth, this timeless cocktail offers the perfect balance of bitter and sweet, making it an ideal sipper for any occasion.
Prep time: 1 minute
Mixing time: 1 minute
Servings: 1
Calories: 164

Ingredients
 

  • 1 oz Gin
  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1 oz sweet Vermouth
  • Ice cubes
  • Orange slice or twist - for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Old Fashioned Glass
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon

Instructions

  • Prep Glass: Fill your Old Fashioned glass with ice cubes.
  • Add Gin: Pour 1 oz Gin into the mixing glass.
  • Add Campari: Measure and pour 1 oz Campari into the glass.
  • Add Vermouth: Add 1 oz sweet Vermouth to the mix.
  • Stir Gently: Use a bar spoon to stir the ingredients gently.
  • Strain: Re-fill the Old Fashioned glass with fresh ice and strain the mixture into the glass.
  • Garnish: Place an orange slice or twist into the glass for garnish.
  • Serve: Enjoy your Negroni immediately. Cheers!

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Gin: If you find yourself without gin, you can try vodka for a less botanical flavor. I've also used Aperol instead of Campari for a softer, less bitter profile.
  • Campari: Aperol is a good alternative if you prefer something other than Campari's bitter edge. It's lighter but still brings that orange essence.
  • Sweet Vermouth: I've used dry vermouth in a pinch. It changes the character of the drink but still works. Just add a small splash of simple syrup to balance the bitterness.

Making a Pitcher of Negroni:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 8 oz of gin, 8 oz of Campari, and 8 oz of sweet vermouth.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth. Stir well.
  • Serve: Pour the mixture into individual ice-filled Old Fashioned glasses, garnish with an orange slice or twist, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Gin Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic gin substitute; these are available and do a reasonable job mimicking gin's botanicals. You can also replace gin for soda water.
  • Campari Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic aperitif or make a simple syrup infused with orange peel and a touch of bitterness from a dash of grapefruit juice.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes instead of the regular ingredients, follow the original steps, and enjoy a non-alcoholic Negroni.

What is a Negroni?

A Negroni is an Italian cocktail that features Gin, Campari, and Vermouth. Often considered a bartender’s favorite, this cocktail has a unique blend of bitter and sweet, making it a popular choice for many. The drink has its origins in early 20th-century Italy and has steadily gained global recognition and is proudly listed as an official IBA cocktail. You don’t need to be a cocktail aficionado to appreciate a good Negroni; its perfect classic recipe makes it accessible and enjoyable for everyone.

A side shot of a Negroni cocktail in a old-fashioned glass on a wooden tray, with an orange and a little branch with flowers

What is a Negroni made of – The ingredients

The recipe for a Negroni requires these components:

  • Gin: Acts as the foundational spirit, lending complex botanical notes to the cocktail.
  • Campari: Introduces a bitter element, contrasting the sweetness of the other ingredients and adding depth.
  • Sweet Vermouth: Softens the bitterness of the Campari and complements the gin, adding herbal and sweet undertones.
  • Ice Cubes: Chill the components to meld the flavors together while slightly diluting the drink for better sippability.
  • Orange Slice or Twist: Enhances the visual appeal and adds a subtle citrus aroma, elevating the overall drinking experience.

Gin, Campari and sweet Vermouth laid out on a white bar table

How do you make a Negroni recipe?

Our step-by-step guide shows you how to make a Negroni:

1
<p>Start by filling an Old Fashioned glass with ice cubes to prepare the glass for the cocktail.</p>

Start by filling an Old Fashioned glass with ice cubes to prepare the glass for the cocktail.

2
<p>In a mixing glass, pour one ounce of gin into the glass, ensuring the botanical base of the cocktail.</p>

In a mixing glass, pour one ounce of gin into the glass, ensuring the botanical base of the cocktail.

3
<p>Add one ounce of Campari to introduce the drink’s signature bitterness and rich color.</p>

Add one ounce of Campari to introduce the drink’s signature bitterness and rich color.

4
<p>Measure and pour one ounce of sweet vermouth, balancing out the Campari’s bitterness.</p>

Measure and pour one ounce of sweet vermouth, balancing out the Campari’s bitterness.

5
<p>Fill your mixing glass with ice cubes.</p>

Fill your mixing glass with ice cubes.

6
<p>With a bar spoon stir the ingredients gently, combining the flavors and chilling the drink evenly.</p>

With a bar spoon stir the ingredients gently, combining the flavors and chilling the drink evenly.

7
<p>Re-fill the Old Fashioned glass with fresh ice and strain the mixture into the glass.</p>

Re-fill the Old Fashioned glass with fresh ice and strain the mixture into the glass.

8
<p>Garnish the cocktail with an orange slice or twist to enhance its visual appeal and add a subtle citrus aroma.</p>

Garnish the cocktail with an orange slice or twist to enhance its visual appeal and add a subtle citrus aroma.

9
<p>Enjoy your Negroni!</p>

Enjoy your Negroni!

Using Prosecco (Negroni Sbagliato)

Swapping out gin for Prosecco turns the classic Negroni into a lighter, bubbly affair. This twist is often called a Negroni Sbagliato. Prosecco’s effervescence brings a new texture, making the drink a bit less intense than its gin-based counterpart. The sparkling wine complements the sweet vermouth and Campari nicely, creating a more refreshing and less boozy beverage. To make it, you simply replace gin with an equal amount of Prosecco, then stir gently to mix the ingredients without killing the fizz. It’s an easy way to put a spin on the classic without complicating things.

Negroni Spritz

A Negroni Spritz is a refreshing twist on the classic Negroni that incorporates sparkling water or soda. The addition of fizz lightens up the drink, making it an especially good option for warm weather or daytime sipping. It retains the hallmark bitterness of a Negroni but adds a bubbly, effervescent element that some people find more approachable.

A side shot of a Negroni cocktail in an old-fashioned glass on a stone plate in front of a little branch with flowers

Variations

Want something special? Take a look at our awesome twists:

  • Boulevardier: This mix replaces gin with bourbon or rye, introducing a warmer, spicier touch. The bourbon’s richness complements the bitterness of Campari beautifully. I find the blend of whiskey’s warmth with the herbal notes utterly captivating. It’s my go-to for a cozy evening.
  • White Negroni: Gin pairs with Lillet Blanc and Suze for a lighter, less bitter experience. The Lillet Blanc brings a sweet, floral quality, contrasting nicely with Suze’s earthy bitterness. I appreciate this for its elegant simplicity and the way it lightens up the classic’s intensity.
  • Old Pal: Rye whiskey and dry vermouth come together, creating a drier, crisper feel. The rye’s spiciness and the dry vermouth’s subtlety offer a refined taste.
  • Cardinale: Drier still, this blend uses dry vermouth with gin and Campari. The dry vermouth’s crispness makes it notably more refreshing.
  • Kingston Negroni: This twist incorporates dark rum, lending a rich, tropical flair. The rum’s sweetness and depth add an intriguing complexity.
  • Cynar Negroni: Substituting Campari with Cynar, an artichoke-based bitter, this concoction is earthier and more nuanced. The unique herbal profile of Cynar offers a delightful surprise.
  • Oaxaca: Swapping gin for mezcal, brings a smoky intrigue. The mezcal’s smokiness adds a new dimension, harmonizing with the other ingredients.
  • Unusual: This blend adds elderflower liqueur to the classic trio, introducing a sweet, floral character. The elderflower’s lightness adds a playful twist.
  • Pisco Negroni: Pisco replaces gin, offering a grape-based, slightly fruity element. This South American spirit adds a unique, subtly sweet layer.
  • Negroni Fizz: A fizzy version, featuring sparkling wine. The bubbles add a celebratory feel, making it perfect for special occasions.
  • East India Negroni: Incorporating an East India sherry, this version is richer, with a nutty, slightly sweet profile. The sherry’s complexity makes it a fascinating, moreish choice.

A Negroni cocktails, shot from above, in an old-fashioned glass on a stone plate in front of a little branch with flowers

What’s the best Gin for a Negroni?

When making a standout Negroni, the choice of gin plays a significant role. While London Dry gins like Beefeater or Tanqueray offer a classic, juniper-heavy profile, you could also opt for something more modern and botanical, like Hendrick’s. But if you ask me for a Negroni that’s truly top-notch, you can’t go wrong with Bombay Sapphire. This gin has just the right balance of botanicals to harmonize with the sweet Vermouth and Campari. Its nuanced flavors don’t overpower, but they hold their own, adding complexity to the drink. So, if you’re serious about your Negroni, Bombay Sapphire is a solid pick that won’t disappoint you.

History and Origin

The Negroni cocktail traces its roots back to early 20th-century Florence, Italy. According to popular lore, Count Camillo Negroni first conceived the drink when he asked his bartender, Fosco Scarselli, to strengthen his favorite cocktail, the Americano, by replacing the soda water with gin. Intrigued by the idea, Scarselli also added an orange garnish instead of the typical lemon slice to signal that the drink was different from an Americano. The result captivated the Count and quickly gained popularity among the bar’s patrons.

As the story goes, the new drink became so popular that the Negroni family decided to create a Negroni Distillery in 1919, producing a ready-made version of the cocktail called Antico Negroni. Over time, the Negroni gained international recognition, thanks in part to its straightforward recipe and the rise of cocktail culture globally.

A side shot of a Negroni cocktail in an old-fashioned glass on a black stone black in front of a little branch with flowers

Pre-mixed Ready to drink Negroni (Campari Negroni)

If you’re looking for the classic Negroni experience without the hassle of mixing one yourself, there are some solid pre-mixed options on the market. Brands like Highball and Curatif offer canned Negronis that capture the essential flavors of the cocktail. Highball’s Negroni maintains the bitterness you’d expect, while Curatif’s version leans into the botanical notes of the gin. But when it comes to a pre-mixed Negroni that truly hits the mark, Campari’s own bottled Negroni stands out. It combines Campari, red vermouth, and gin in the perfect 1:1:1 ratio. The blend is smooth, and well-balanced and saves you the trouble of gathering ingredients and tools. Just pour it over ice, add an orange slice, and you’re good to go. Trust me, it’s hard to beat the Campari Negroni for a quick, no-fuss option.

 

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FAQ

How many calories are in a Negroni?
A standard Negroni has around 200 calories, largely from the alcoholic components and sweet vermouth.
How strong is a Negroni?
A Negroni typically has an alcohol by volume (ABV) of around 24%, making it a relatively strong cocktail.
What type of alcohol is used in a Negroni?
A classic Negroni uses gin as its primary spirit, along with Campari and sweet vermouth.
In which glass is a Negroni served?
The Negroni is usually served in an Old Fashioned glass, also known as a rocks glass.
What does a Negroni taste like?
The Negroni offers a complex balance of bitterness from the Campari, sweetness from the vermouth, and botanical notes from the gin.
Who invented the Negroni?
Count Camillo Negroni is credited with inventing the drink in early 20th-century Florence, Italy.
Is a Negroni always garnished with an orange slice?
Traditionally, yes, the Negroni comes garnished with an orange slice or twist.

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