Chrysanthemum Cocktail Drink

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

This Chrysanthemum Cocktail recipe is your ticket to a flavorful, light and enticing drink! It’s simple to make and the perfect cocktail for any occasion.

Chrysanthemum Cocktail Recipe

Savor the aroma of dry vermouth, Benedictine, and Absinthe in this delightful Chrysanthemum Cocktail recipe! It's the perfect drink to enjoy on an aperitivo with friends.

Prep time:

1 minute

Mixing time:

1 minute

Servings:

1

Calories:

216 kl

Ingredients

  • 2 oz dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz Benedictine
  • 3 dashes Absinthe, or sprays if using a spray bottle
  • Orange twist, for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Cocktail Glass (Martini or Coupe style)
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon

Instructions

  • Fill your cocktail glass with ice to chill it. Set it aside.
  • Pour 3 dashes Absinthe into the mixing glass.
  • Add 2 oz dry Vermouth.
  • Finally, add 1 oz Benedictine to the mix.
  • Fill the mixing glass with ice. Using a bar spoon or a long stirrer, stir well (for about 15-20 seconds). Give it a taste and stir a bit more if you feel like more dilution is necessary.
  • Take your cocktail glass and discard the ice. Using the cocktail strainer, strain the mixture into the chilled glass.
  • Garnish with an orange twist. You can either place it on the rim of the glass or directly inside the drink.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Dry Vermouth: You can substitute dry vermouth with white vermouth, which is slightly sweeter. It should make for a really good cocktail too!
  • Benedictine: This is a unique herbal liqueur and hard to replace, but in a pinch, you could try using Drambuie, Chartreuse, or Galliano. They all have a complex herbal flavor that can stand in for Benedictine, although you may need to adjust the quantities (especially if using Chartreuse, which is a very strong spirit, both in terms of taste and alcohol content).
  • Absinthe: Pernod or any other pastis can be used as a substitute for Absinthe. They both have that strong anise flavor that is key to this cocktail.

Making a Pitcher of Chrysanthemum Cocktail:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 16 oz of dry vermouth, 8 oz of Benedictine, and 16 dashes of Absinthe.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the dry vermouth, Benedictine, and Absinthe. Add ice and stir well. Strain to remove the ice, serve immediately into chilled cocktail glasses, and garnish with orange zests. If you have some leftovers, be sure to keep them in the fridge as vermouth is prone to oxidation when kept at room temperature.
  • Serve: Pour the mixture into chilled cocktail glasses, garnish with an orange twist, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Dry Vermouth Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic vermouth (Martini Floreale for instance). These are usually widely available in liquor stores.
  • Benedictine Substitute: Make a simple syrup infused with various herbs and spices. Try combinations like vanilla and clove, or cinnamon and star anise. You can also add a bit of rosemary to your preparation; it will give a touch of freshness and great herbal notes to your syrup. If you choose to use a syrup to make your drink, you may want to use less than 1 oz or your cocktail may get very sweet. Start by using only ½ oz, taste, and adjust from there.
  • Absinthe Substitute: You can use culinary star anise essence or flavoring in place of the absinthe. Please note that 2 dashes of absinthe in an otherwise alcohol-free drink won’t raise the overall ABV of the drink. The drink will indeed chemically contain a drop of alcohol, but won’t make you intoxicated at all. Depending on your reason for not drinking alcohol and your degree of tolerance on the topic, this can also be a suitable option.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes instead of the regular ingredients, follow the original steps, and enjoy a non-alcoholic version.

Making it Vegan:

Absinthe and vermouth are usually vegan, but Benedictine contains honey. You may want to replace it with another herbal liqueur, but make sure to check the ingredient list as a lot of them use honey as a sweetening agent (that’s also the case for Chartreuse and Drambuie for instance). Depending on where you live, the brands may be different but this kind of liqueur is usually pretty common and relatively easy to find.

Nutrition Facts

Calories
216
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
0.2
g
0
%
Sodium
 
8
mg
0
%
Carbohydrates
 
24
g
8
%
Sugar
 
18
g
20
%
Potassium
 
64
mg
2
%
Protein
 
0.2
g
0
%
Calcium
 
5
mg
1
%
Iron
 
0.2
mg
1
%

 

Chrysanthemum Cocktail Drink

Chrysanthemum Cocktail Recipe

Gavin Wrigley Written by Gavin Wrigley
Jump to Video
Savor the aroma of dry vermouth, Benedictine, and Absinthe in this delightful Chrysanthemum Cocktail recipe! It's the perfect drink to enjoy on an aperitivo with friends.
Prep time: 1 minute
Mixing time: 1 minute
Servings: 1
Calories: 216

Ingredients
 

  • 2 oz dry Vermouth
  • 1 oz Benedictine
  • 3 dashes Absinthe - or sprays if using a spray bottle
  • Orange twist - for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Cocktail Glass (Martini or Coupe style)
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon

Instructions

  • Fill your cocktail glass with ice to chill it. Set it aside.
  • Pour 3 dashes Absinthe into the mixing glass.
  • Add 2 oz dry Vermouth.
  • Finally, add 1 oz Benedictine to the mix.
  • Fill the mixing glass with ice. Using a bar spoon or a long stirrer, stir well (for about 15-20 seconds). Give it a taste and stir a bit more if you feel like more dilution is necessary.
  • Take your cocktail glass and discard the ice. Using the cocktail strainer, strain the mixture into the chilled glass.
  • Garnish with an orange twist. You can either place it on the rim of the glass or directly inside the drink.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Dry Vermouth: You can substitute dry vermouth with white vermouth, which is slightly sweeter. It should make for a really good cocktail too!
  • Benedictine: This is a unique herbal liqueur and hard to replace, but in a pinch, you could try using Drambuie, Chartreuse, or Galliano. They all have a complex herbal flavor that can stand in for Benedictine, although you may need to adjust the quantities (especially if using Chartreuse, which is a very strong spirit, both in terms of taste and alcohol content).
  • Absinthe: Pernod or any other pastis can be used as a substitute for Absinthe. They both have that strong anise flavor that is key to this cocktail.

Making a Pitcher of Chrysanthemum Cocktail:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 16 oz of dry vermouth, 8 oz of Benedictine, and 16 dashes of Absinthe.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the dry vermouth, Benedictine, and Absinthe. Add ice and stir well. Strain to remove the ice, serve immediately into chilled cocktail glasses, and garnish with orange zests. If you have some leftovers, be sure to keep them in the fridge as vermouth is prone to oxidation when kept at room temperature.
  • Serve: Pour the mixture into chilled cocktail glasses, garnish with an orange twist, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Dry Vermouth Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic vermouth (Martini Floreale for instance). These are usually widely available in liquor stores.
  • Benedictine Substitute: Make a simple syrup infused with various herbs and spices. Try combinations like vanilla and clove, or cinnamon and star anise. You can also add a bit of rosemary to your preparation; it will give a touch of freshness and great herbal notes to your syrup. If you choose to use a syrup to make your drink, you may want to use less than 1 oz or your cocktail may get very sweet. Start by using only ½ oz, taste, and adjust from there.
  • Absinthe Substitute: You can use culinary star anise essence or flavoring in place of the absinthe. Please note that 2 dashes of absinthe in an otherwise alcohol-free drink won’t raise the overall ABV of the drink. The drink will indeed chemically contain a drop of alcohol, but won’t make you intoxicated at all. Depending on your reason for not drinking alcohol and your degree of tolerance on the topic, this can also be a suitable option.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes instead of the regular ingredients, follow the original steps, and enjoy a non-alcoholic version.

Making it Vegan:

Absinthe and vermouth are usually vegan, but Benedictine contains honey. You may want to replace it with another herbal liqueur, but make sure to check the ingredient list as a lot of them use honey as a sweetening agent (that’s also the case for Chartreuse and Drambuie for instance). Depending on where you live, the brands may be different but this kind of liqueur is usually pretty common and relatively easy to find.

What is a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?

A Chrysanthemum Cocktail is a vermouth-based drink made of dry vermouth, Benedictine, and Absinthe. This drink is relatively easy to prepare as it only requires three ingredients. However, achieving the perfect balance can be slightly tricky due to the solid herbal notes from both Benedictine and Absinthe – but fear not, we’re here to guide you through.

A side shot of a Chrysanthemum cocktail in a cocktail glass on a multicolor tray surrounded by a strainer, a green bowl with orange wedges, and a bar spoon.

What is a Chrysanthemum Cocktail made of – The ingredients

Get ready to make your Chrysanthemum Cocktail with these ingredients:

  • Dry Vermouth: The cocktail’s base provides a dry, aromatic flavor.
  • Benedictine D.O.M.: A herbal liqueur that adds a complex, sweet, and spicy layer to the drink.
  • Absinthe: Used sparingly, it gives the cocktail a subtle aniseed kick. It also contributes to the drink’s full-bodied structure.
  • Orange Peel: Serves as garnish and adds a citrusy aroma to enhance the overall experience, both in terms of taste, appearance and smell.

Dry Vermouth, Absinthe, and Benedictine laid out on a white bar table

How do you make a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?

With our clear instructions, learn the art of making a Chrysanthemum Cocktail step by step:

1
<p>Begin by chilling a cocktail glass. This can be done by filling it with ice and letting it sit while you prepare the cocktail.</p>

Begin by chilling a cocktail glass. This can be done by filling it with ice and letting it sit while you prepare the cocktail.

2
<p>In a mixing glass, pour in 3 dashes of Absinthe. This will add a unique anise flavor to your cocktail. It is used as a bitter, just like you would put a few dashes of Angostura in an Old Fashioned.</p>

In a mixing glass, pour in 3 dashes of Absinthe. This will add a unique anise flavor to your cocktail. It is used as a bitter, just like you would put a few dashes of Angostura in an Old Fashioned.

3
<p>Pour 2 ounces of dry vermouth. This will serve as the base and main spirit of your cocktail.</p>

Pour 2 ounces of dry vermouth. This will serve as the base and main spirit of your cocktail.

4
<p>Finally, add 1 ounce of Benedictine to the mixing glass. This herbal liqueur will give your cocktail a complex, sweet flavor.</p>

Finally, add 1 ounce of Benedictine to the mixing glass. This herbal liqueur will give your cocktail a complex, sweet flavor.

5
<p>Fill the mixing glass with ice. Using a bar spoon or a long stirrer, stir well (for about 15-20 seconds). Give it a taste and stir a bit more if you feel like more dilution is necessary.</p>

Fill the mixing glass with ice. Using a bar spoon or a long stirrer, stir well (for about 15-20 seconds). Give it a taste and stir a bit more if you feel like more dilution is necessary.

6
<p>Once the cocktail is well mixed, discard the ice from your chilled cocktail glass and strain the cocktail into the chilled glass. This will remove any ice shards and ensure a smooth cocktail.</p>

Once the cocktail is well mixed, discard the ice from your chilled cocktail glass and strain the cocktail into the chilled glass. This will remove any ice shards and ensure a smooth cocktail.

7
<p>Finally, twist a piece of orange peel over the glass to express its oils.</p>

Finally, twist a piece of orange peel over the glass to express its oils.

8
<p>Then drop it into the cocktail or place it on the rim of the glass. This will add a bright, citrusy note to your Chrysanthemum Cocktail.</p>

Then drop it into the cocktail or place it on the rim of the glass. This will add a bright, citrusy note to your Chrysanthemum Cocktail.

History and Origin

The Chrysanthemum Cocktail has a story that starts in the early 1900s. Hugo R. Ensslin, a top bartender at the Hotel Wallick in New York, first wrote the recipe in his 1916 book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks.” This book was one of the last essential cocktail books to be published before Prohibition. In this version, the recipe called for equal parts of dry vermouth and Bénédictine. The recipe as we know it today, based on a 2:1 ratio, appeared later in Harry Craddock’s famous “The Savoy Cocktail” book, published in 1930. This cocktail may either be named after the Chrysanthemum flower or, more probably, after an eponymous piece by composer and pianist Scott Joplin, released on record in 1916.

A Chrysanthemum cocktail, shot from above, in a cocktail glass on a beige surface with dry Vermouth, Absinthe, and Benedictine around

See More

Did you make this recipe?

We’d love to see how you crafted our recipes!
Tag us on Instagram at @_drinksworld

FAQ

How many calories are in a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?
A standard serving of the Chrysanthemum Cocktail contains approximately 150-200 calories. However, this can vary depending on the specific brands of alcohol used and the size of the serving.
How strong is a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?
The strength of a Chrysanthemum Cocktail typically falls around 20% ABV (Alcohol By Volume), which translates to 40 proof. This makes it a relatively mild cocktail.
What type of alcohol is used in a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?
The primary alcohol in a Chrysanthemum Cocktail is dry vermouth, complemented by Benedictine, an herbal liqueur, and Absinthe for an added kick.
In what kind of glass is a Chrysanthemum Cocktail served?
Traditionally, you serve a Chrysanthemum Cocktail in a chilled cocktail glass, either Martini or coupe style.
What does a Chrysanthemum Cocktail taste like?
A Chrysanthemum Cocktail offers a unique blend of flavors. The dry vermouth provides a wine-like base, while the Benedictine adds sweet and herbal notes. The Absinthe adds an anise or licorice flavor, creating a complex and sophisticated taste profile.
What is the ratio of ingredients in a Chrysanthemum Cocktail?
The typical ratio for a Chrysanthemum Cocktail is 2 parts dry vermouth, 1 part Benedictine, and a few dashes of Absinthe. This balance allows each ingredient to shine without overpowering the others and create a perfectly balanced cocktail.
How is the Chrysanthemum Cocktail served with ice?
A Chrysanthemum Cocktail is usually stirred with ice and then strained into a cocktail glass, with no added ice. This method, known as serving "up," ensures the drink is chilled but not diluted by melting ice.

Categories

Types

Flavours

Share
Pin
Post
Share
Send
Email

Rate this recipe

I don’t like it

It’s not bad

I like it

I really like it!

I love it!

Comments

Leave a Reply

Language

Recipe Overview

Explore our recipes by the categories below.

By spirit

By type

By flavour

Spirits Overview

Explore our spirits by the categories below.

Types