Dry Martini Cocktail Drink

Dry Martini

A shot of Gavin Wrigley looking to the camera in a dimly lit room
Written by Gavin Wrigley
Andrea
Tested by
Andrea Ottaiano
4.50 from 2 votes

Are you looking for a classic cocktail? This Dry Martini recipe is your answer! Just a couple of ingredients, and you’ve got a simple yet refined drink.

Dry Martini Recipe

Enjoy a classy night with our simple Dry Martini recipe! Made with Gin and a touch of dry Vermouth, this cocktail is pure elegance in a glass.

Prep time:

1 minute

Mixing time:

1 minute

Servings:

1

Calories:

139 kl

Ingredients

  • 2 oz Gin
  • 1 barspoon dry Vermouth
  • Ice cubes
  • Lemon twist or olive, for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Martini Glass
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon
  • Strainer

Instructions

  • Chill Glass: To chill, place your Martini glass in the freezer for a few hours or ice it up just before starting.
  • Add Vermouth: Pour 1 barspoon dry Vermouth into the mixing glass.
  • Add Gin: Pour 2 oz Gin into the mixing glass.
  • Stir Gently: Add ice cubes and use a bar spoon to stir the ingredients gently for about 30 seconds.
  • Prepare Glass: Empty your chilled martini glass.
  • Strain: Strain the mixture into your chilled Martini glass.
  • Garnish: Add a lemon twist or an olive for garnish.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Gin: Vodka makes a fine substitute if you don't have Gin. I've done this many times, and it creates a Vodka Martini. The flavor profile changes, but it's still a classic.
  • Dry Vermouth: I've used white wine or even a splash of sherry in a pinch. The drink changes, but you might discover a new favorite.

Making a Pitcher of Dry Martini:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 16 oz of Gin and 8 bar spoons of dry Vermouth.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the Gin and dry vermouth with ice cubes. Stir well.
  • Serve: Strain the mixture into chilled Martini glasses, garnish with a lemon twist or olive, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Gin Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic gin substitute; they're available and mimic Gin's botanicals quite well.
  • Vermouth Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic dry vermouth substitute or a splash of non-alcoholic white wine.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes and follow the original steps for a non-alcoholic Dry Martini.

Making it Vegan:

  • Garnish: If you typically use an olive stuffed with blue cheese, switch to a plain olive or a lemon twist to keep it vegan.
  • Check Labels: Some vermouth brands might use animal products in their fining process. Make sure to use a vegan-friendly brand. Many alcoholic products are not required to display their ingredients on the label, so using websites like Barnivore could be helpful for obtaining this information.

Nutrition Facts

Calories
139
% Daily Value*
Sodium
 
1
mg
0
%
Carbohydrates
 
1
g
0
%
Sugar
 
0.1
g
0
%
Potassium
 
6
mg
0
%
Calcium
 
0.4
mg
0
%
Iron
 
0.02
mg
0
%

 

Dry Martini Cocktail Drink

Dry Martini Recipe

Gavin Wrigley Written by Gavin Wrigley
4.50 from 2 votes
Jump to Video
Enjoy a classy night with our simple Dry Martini recipe! Made with Gin and a touch of dry Vermouth, this cocktail is pure elegance in a glass.
Prep time: 1 minute
Mixing time: 1 minute
Servings: 1
Calories: 139

Ingredients
 

  • 2 oz Gin
  • 1 barspoon dry Vermouth
  • Ice cubes
  • Lemon twist or olive - for garnish, optional

Equipment

  • Martini Glass
  • Measuring Jigger
  • Mixing Glass
  • Stirrer or Bar Spoon
  • Strainer

Instructions

  • Chill Glass: To chill, place your Martini glass in the freezer for a few hours or ice it up just before starting.
  • Add Vermouth: Pour 1 barspoon dry Vermouth into the mixing glass.
  • Add Gin: Pour 2 oz Gin into the mixing glass.
  • Stir Gently: Add ice cubes and use a bar spoon to stir the ingredients gently for about 30 seconds.
  • Prepare Glass: Empty your chilled martini glass.
  • Strain: Strain the mixture into your chilled Martini glass.
  • Garnish: Add a lemon twist or an olive for garnish.

Notes

Substitutes:

  • Gin: Vodka makes a fine substitute if you don't have Gin. I've done this many times, and it creates a Vodka Martini. The flavor profile changes, but it's still a classic.
  • Dry Vermouth: I've used white wine or even a splash of sherry in a pinch. The drink changes, but you might discover a new favorite.

Making a Pitcher of Dry Martini:

  • Scale: To make a pitcher that serves 8, multiply all the ingredients by 8. That would be 16 oz of Gin and 8 bar spoons of dry Vermouth.
  • Mix: In a large pitcher, combine the Gin and dry vermouth with ice cubes. Stir well.
  • Serve: Strain the mixture into chilled Martini glasses, garnish with a lemon twist or olive, and serve immediately.

Making it Non-Alcoholic:

  • Gin Substitute: Use a non-alcoholic gin substitute; they're available and mimic Gin's botanicals quite well.
  • Vermouth Substitute: Opt for a non-alcoholic dry vermouth substitute or a splash of non-alcoholic white wine.
  • Proceed As Usual: Use these non-alcoholic substitutes and follow the original steps for a non-alcoholic Dry Martini.

Making it Vegan:

  • Garnish: If you typically use an olive stuffed with blue cheese, switch to a plain olive or a lemon twist to keep it vegan.
  • Check Labels: Some vermouth brands might use animal products in their fining process. Make sure to use a vegan-friendly brand. Many alcoholic products are not required to display their ingredients on the label, so using websites like Barnivore could be helpful for obtaining this information.

What is a Dry Martini?

A Dry Martini is a cocktail featuring Gin and dry Vermouth. It’s a drink that epitomizes sophistication and has a history dating back to the early 20th century. The term “dry” in Dry Martini refers to dry Vermouth, which sets it apart from other Martini variations. The cocktail is listed under “The Unforgettables” by the International Bartender Association(IBA).

A side shot of a Dry Martini cocktail garnished with lemon twist in a martini glass on a coaster with an orange on a side placed on a white marmol table in front of a yellow wall.

What is Dry Martini made of – The ingredients

Get the following ingredients ready to prepare making a Dry Martini:

  • Gin: Provides the base spirit and brings botanical flavors to the cocktail.
  • Dry Vermouth: Adds complexity and an herbal note, balancing the Gin.
  • Ice Cubes: Chill the ingredients to the desired temperature without diluting them too much.
  • Lemon Twist or Olive: Serves as a garnish, adding a subtle aroma and a touch of visual appeal.

Dry vermouth and gin laid out on a white bar table.

 

How do you make a Dry Martini?

Follow our guide to make a great Dry Martini:

1
<p>First, chill your Martini glass in the freezer for a few hours or add some ice cubes before starting.</p>

First, chill your Martini glass in the freezer for a few hours or add some ice cubes before starting.

2
<p>Measure and add 1 bar spoon of dry Vermouth to the mixing glass to balance and complement the Gin.</p>

Measure and add 1 bar spoon of dry Vermouth to the mixing glass to balance and complement the Gin.

3
<p>Pour 2 oz of Gin into the mixing glass to establish the cocktail’s base.</p>

Pour 2 oz of Gin into the mixing glass to establish the cocktail’s base.

4
<p>Fill the mixing glass three-quarters full with ice cubes </p>

Fill the mixing glass three-quarters full with ice cubes

5
<p>Stir the ingredients gently with a bar spoon for about 30 seconds to mix and chill them well.</p>

Stir the ingredients gently with a bar spoon for about 30 seconds to mix and chill them well.

6
<p>Strain the mixture into your chilled Martini glass to remove the ice.</p>

Strain the mixture into your chilled Martini glass to remove the ice.

7
<p>In case of using lemon as garnish. Twist a lemon peel over the glass to extract the lemon juice.</p>

In case of using lemon as garnish. Twist a lemon peel over the glass to extract the lemon juice.

8
<p>Place the lemon twist in the glass, adding a final aroma touch and visual appeal.</p>

Place the lemon twist in the glass, adding a final aroma touch and visual appeal.

9
<p>Enjoy your dry Martini with lemon twist.</p>

Enjoy your dry Martini with lemon twist.

10
<p>In case of using olives as garnish. Place a stick with three olives into the glass.</p>

In case of using olives as garnish. Place a stick with three olives into the glass.

11
<p>Enjoy your dry Martini with olives.</p>

Enjoy your dry Martini with olives.

What is the difference between a Martini, a Dirty Martini, and a Dry Martini?

A Martini is a classic cocktail that typically consists of Gin and Vermouth, and it can come in various ratios of these two ingredients. The garnish can be a lemon twist or an olive, and the drink can be shaken or stirred. A Dirty Martini takes the classic Martini and adds olive brine to the mix, giving the drink a salty, briny character that distinguishes it from its more straightforward counterpart. On the other hand, a Dry Martini specifically uses dry Vermouth instead of sweet Vermouth, and it usually features a higher ratio of Gin to Vermouth, making it a drier, less sweet drink. The term “dry” in Dry Martini refers to dry Vermouth, not the absence of sweetness. Each cocktail offers a unique flavor profile but shares the same foundational elements of Gin and Vermouth.

A side shot of two Dry Martini cocktail, one garnished with lemon twist and the other with olives in martini glasses on coasters with plant leaves on a side placed on a white marmol table in front of a yellow wall.

Wet Martini – 50/50 Martini

A Wet Martini flips the script on the classic Dry Martini by upping the Vermouth. While a Dry Martini leans heavily on Gin with just a splash of Vermouth, a Wet Martini goes for a more balanced approach. You’ll often find a 1:1 ratio of Gin to Vermouth, sometimes even tipping the scales in favor of the Vermouth. This makes for a less boozy cocktail and more herbal, with nuanced flavors that appear more prominently. A Wet Martini might be right up your alley if you find a Dry Martini too strong or too focused on the Gin.

A side shot of a Dry Martini cocktail garnished with olives in a martini glass on a coaster with olives on a side placed on a white marmol table in front of a yellow wall.

Variations

Want to spice up your Martini Game? Try one from our curated selection:

  • Gibson: A pickled onion replaces the usual lemon twist or olive, offering a savory and tangy flavor that I find both intriguing and refreshingly unconventional.
  • Vesper: Gin, vodka, and Lillet Blanc come together in a complex and refreshing blend. The mix of spirits creates a robust yet smooth taste, making it a sophisticated favorite of mine.
  • Vodka Martini: Swapping gin for vodka results in a smoother, less botanical profile. I appreciate the vodka’s neutrality for its straightforward elegance.
  • Perfect Martini: Equal parts dry and sweet vermouth balance each other, creating a nuanced flavor. The harmonious complexity of this mix appeals to me for its refined taste.
  • Fifty-Fifty: Gin and dry vermouth in equal parts make it less boozy and more herbal. The balance highlights the gin’s herbal notes and the vermouth’s dryness.
  • Lemon Drop Martini: Lemon-flavored vodka and lemon juice add a zesty citrus twist. The tartness of the lemon perfectly complements the vodka, offering a refreshingly zesty experience.
  • Espresso Martini: Vodka, coffee liqueur, and espresso blend for a caffeinated kick. This stimulating and indulgent combination makes it an ideal after-dinner choice.
  • French Martini: Pineapple juice and Chambord add a fruity and slightly tart edge. The tropical sweetness of pineapple and the rich berry flavor of Chambord create a delightful balance.
  • Tuxedo: Maraschino liqueur and orange bitters bring sweetness and complexity. The cherry notes of the liqueur and the citrus zest of the bitters create a sophisticated, layered taste.
  • Tequila Martini: Replacing gin with tequila gives a robust, earthy flavor. The boldness of tequila offers an exciting contrast to the traditional martini’s smoothness.
  • Cucumber Martini: Fresh cucumber infuses the gin with a refreshing and crisp note. The coolness of cucumber makes it an ideal choice for a hot summer day.
  • Chocolate Martini: Chocolate liqueur and crème de cacao combine for a dessert-like indulgence. The rich chocolate flavors create a decadent experience, which I find irresistibly indulgent.
  • Pomegranate Martini: Pomegranate juice and orange liqueur add a fruity and tangy taste. The tartness of pomegranate and the sweetness of orange liqueur strike a vibrant and flavorful balance.
  • Elderflower Martini: Liqueur like St-Germain brings a floral and subtly sweet aroma. The delicate sweetness of elderflower adds an enchanting quality, making it a sophisticated and aromatic choice.

Two Dry Martini cocktail, shot from above, one garnished with lemon twist and the other with olives in martini glasses on coasters placed on a white marmol table.

History and Origins of the Dry Martini

The Dry Martini has a storied history dating back to the late 19th or early 20th century. While its origins remain debatable, many attribute its creation to bartenders in the United States. One popular theory suggests that Jerry Thomas, a legendary bartender at the Occidental Hotel in San Francisco, crafted the Martini for a gold miner on his way to the nearby town of Martinez. This led some to believe that the original Martini took its name from this town.

Over time, the Martini underwent several transformations. The original recipe often included Gin, sweet Vermouth, and sometimes even orange bitters. However, as tastes evolved and dry Vermouth became more popular, the Dry Martini became a simpler, more refined version of its predecessor. The term “dry” refers to dry Vermouth, which is less sweet than its sweet counterpart.

The Martini gained significant popularity during Prohibition, partly because Gin was relatively easy to produce illicitly. After Prohibition ended, the Dry Martini continued to gain fame, becoming a staple in American cocktail culture. Icons like Ernest Hemingway and James Bond further popularized the drink, each with their preferred tweaks to the classic recipe.

A side shot of a Dry Martini cocktail garnished with lemon twist in a martini glass on a coaster with oranges on a side placed on a white marmol table in front of a yellow wall.

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FAQ

How many calories are in a Dry Martini?
A standard Dry Martini contains approximately 200 calories.
How strong is a Dry Martini?
The alcohol by volume (ABV) is around 32%, making it 64 proof.
What alcohol is used in a Dry Martini?
Gin is the primary alcohol used in a Dry Martini.
In which glass is a Dry Martini served?
It's typically served in a Martini glass.
What does a Dry Martini taste like?
A Dry Martini has a botanical, slightly herbal taste with a dry finish.
What is the ratio of Gin to Vermouth in a Dry Martini?
The classic ratio is two ounces of gin to one bar spoon of dry Vermouth.
How is a Dry Martini served in terms of ice?
It's usually stirred with ice and then strained, serving it "up" without ice.

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